german sauerkraut

Mix sauerkraut with sugar and caraway seed and stir into pork.
Cut bacon slices in 1 inch pieces and mix slightly with sauerkraut.
Saute onion in … remaining ingredients except sauerkraut.
Brown pork in … water, paprika and salt and simmer 1 hour.
Put sauerkraut in cooking pan … into cooked sauerkraut one medium grated potato.
Heat sauerkraut in double boiler.
Serve bratwurst on top of sauerkraut.
Cut sauerkraut strands in shorter … ingredients.
Use a skillet … all juice from sauerkraut.
Mix altogether in crock pot and simmer at least 1 hour to blend flavors.
Mix sauerkraut, pepper and … 1 1/2 quart dish.

Sauerkraut (/ˈsaʊərkraʊt/; German pronunciation: [ˈzaʊ.ɐˌkʁaʊt] ( listen)), directly translated: "sour cabbage", is finely cut cabbage that has been fermented by various lactic acid bacteria, including Leuconostoc, Lactobacillus, and Pediococcus.[1][2] It has a long shelf-life and a distinctive sour flavor, both of which result from the lactic acid that forms when the bacteria ferment the sugars in the cabbage.

My mom was born in Blanzko (sic)…but just before Hitler came along, omi took a job cooking and running the trout hatchery at the Konigsee Hotel in Berchtesgadin, right under Hitler’s nose 🙁 At any rate….I grew up with wonderful pork roasts, schnitzle (made with pounded, boneless pork chops), sauerkraut (made almost just like yours) and buchteln and zwetschgenknoedel (oh my…how wonderful those are!!) One thing I can’t find and miss terribly (Omi passed away in ’81 and my wonderful mom two years ago)…is a tomato gravy that was served as a soup with rice.
Her son, your chef, has his own interpretation of sauerkraut Bohemian/Bavarian style, and that is what you will find on this page: The recipe for a rich and filling sauerkraut preparation influenced by my Hungarian Czech Austrian Bavarian heritage.

At this point, some people use fancy wooden Sauerkraut stompers, but I use my hand to do the following: press on the salted layer of cabbage with your hand until the juices come up.
Then you keep adding layers of five pounds shredded cabbage, mixed with three tablespoons of salt.
I am a home schooling mother of three, cheese maker, organic gardener, fiber artist and life coach.  My family home steads on five acres close to the North Cascades, where we teach cheese making, goat raising, bow making, archery, and nature classes.
 How many pounds of cabbage you need depends on the size of the cabbage and on how much kraut you want to make.
You should walk into my house right now, with all the fermenting cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, cucumber, and cheese drying before it’s packed.

Also if you grow you own cabbage using the Mittleider gardening method your cabbage will be very sweet and have a mild flavor.
I know because we have made it with store bought cabbage and Mittleider garden cabbage.

Sauerkraut is finely sliced green cabbage that has been fermented by lactic acid bacteria (Leuconostoc, Lactobacillus, and Pediococcus).
The fermentation process (also known as pickling) gives the cabbage a distinct sour flavor, which is where it gets the name Sauerkraut (sour cabbage).
The process of making Sauerkraut begins by washing and finely slicing the white cabbage.
  Finished Sauerkraut can be purchased in many German food stores as well as in many markets.
Photo: © ExQuisine – Fotolia.com      Sauerkraut is made by a process of pickling called lacto-fermentation.
Once Sauerkraut is fully cured, it can keep for several months in an airtight container (See "How Sauerkraut is Made" to the left).

In Germany's Pfalz region, cooks braise sauerkraut with onions, apples, seasonings, a touch of sugar and a little of the region's Riesling wine, creating an addictive accompaniment for juicy weisswurst or bratwurst.
Add the onion to the casserole, cover partially and cook over moderately low heat, stirring occasionally, until very soft, about 20 minutes.
Add the bacon and cook over moderately high heat until the fat is rendered and the bacon is crisp, about 5 minutes.
Poke the sausages several times with a fork and cook them over moderate heat, turning several times, until golden and heated through, about 8 minutes.
Reduce the heat to low, cover and cook until the apple is very tender, about 45 minutes.
Add the wine, apple, juniper berries, bay leaves, sugar, 1 teaspoon of kosher salt and 1/2 teaspoon of pepper and boil for 3 minutes.

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Use any fully cooked German-style sausage, such as bratwurst, flavored with ginger, nutmeg, and other spices; smoked knockwurst, made with beef or pork; and mild weisswurst, containing cream, lemon, and cardamom.

After a stint running a restaurant in Stuttgart, Germany, in the mid-1990s, Lukas returned to the United States and took a course on fermented foods at Bauman College, a holistic nutrition and culinary school in Santa Cruz.
Kathryn Lukas founded Farmhouse Culture, a small organic sauerkraut business, in Santa Cruz, California.
For some of the more unconventional flavors — including sauerkrauts spiked with horseradish and leeks or smoked jalapenos — she draws inspiration from kimchi, the fiery fermented cabbage beloved in Korea, or curtido, a spicy cabbage salad that’s a favorite in El Salvador.
Appropriately enough, the city is halfway between two world bastions of fermented cabbage — Munich, Germany, and Seoul, South Korea — both culinary muses for Lukas.
Although Lukas founded her business in 2008, setting up shop at a historic mill built in the early 1900s, her interest in sauerkraut goes back more than a decade.
All Farmhouse Culture sauerkrauts are naturally fermented (keep reading for a crash course on the process) and righteously tart, with a distinct crunch often lost in mass-produced versions of the condiment.
Sauerkraut is also, of course, "as American as apple pie," says Lukas, a third-generation Californian and a professional chef.
Hear Lukas talk about the versatility of sauerkraut and you’ll start to wonder why you’ve always limited the condiment to hot dogs.

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Cover with dry white wine, a tsp of minced garlic, 1 med onion, finely chopped, 1 med apple, finely chopped.
Cover with dry white wine, a tsp of minced garlic, 1 med onion, finely chopped, 1 med apple, finely chopped.
She would make this dish on Sundays; brown pork ribs and sausage, place in casserole with diced potatoes, then cover with the kraut.
1 tablespoon sugar, 1 tablespoon caraway seed, 1 tsp white pepper.
1 tablespoon sugar, 1 tablespoon caraway seed, 1 tsp white pepper.
Grated granny smith apple, brown sugar and caraway seed.

1 cup equals 325 calories, 23 g fat (9 g saturated fat), 72 mg cholesterol, 1,041 mg sodium, 10 g carbohydrate, 2 g fiber, 18 g protein.
1 cup equals 325 calories, 23 g fat (9 g saturated fat), 72 mg cholesterol, 1,041 mg sodium, 10 g carbohydrate, 2 g fiber, 18 g protein.
In a Dutch oven, cook ribs in water until tender, about 1-1/2 hours.
Meanwhile, cook bacon until crisp; remove to paper towels to drain.

“On of the many attributes of Germans, making them figures of fun in foreign eyes, is that they are sauerkraut eaters, which those people regard as the most striking evidence of a very primitive cuisine,” complained Professor Fritz Eichholtz, a medical practitioner, back in 1941 in his work Sauerkraut und ähnliche Gärerzeugnisse (i.e. Sauerkraut and similar fermented products).
As well as containing vitamin C and various minerals, sauerkraut also contains a substance to which experts attribute quite miraculous health effects – lactic acid, which gives the cabbage its sour taste.
The Allemanni tribe gave its name to a whole people – in France, the Germans are called ‘les allemands’”, writes von Wimpffen in his book Sauerkraut, which has become a standard work on the subject.
The English sailor James Cook (1728 to 1779) is supposed to have been the first to have taken barrels of sauerkraut with him on his ships to protect his crews on their month-long Pacific voyages from scurvy, a feared disease resulting from a lack of vitamin C.
Eichholtz’s interest was less in the image of Germans than that the healthy panacea of sauerkraut could become discredited by using “Krauts” in derogatory fashion.

Bring to a boil, then turn heat down to med., and cook 10 – 12 minutes, turning occasionally, until water evaporates and bratwurst begin to brown.
Over medium heat, brown the apples and onions in the melted butter, until they are nicely caramelized and tender, stirring constantly.
The water will cook the brats through, and then all boil out, but the butter will cling to the brat skins, and brown them nicely.
Cook the sauerkraut/apple/onion/brown sugar/beer mixture over very low heat, stirring occasionally, until it’s caramelized and a nice, golden brown color.
Place bacon pieces, onions and vinaigrette in pan and cook 5 – 6 minutes, stirring frequently, until onions are caramelized.
Sprinkle the brown sugar over all, and toss well in the browned butter that’s in the pan.Turn to LOW, add the beer, black pepper and [optional] caraway seed.

Until I find an unpasteurized kraut that tastes this good I will keep buying this brand.The flavor is unmatched and very authentic taste.
We recommend that you do not rely solely on the information presented and that you always read labels, warnings, and directions before using or consuming a product.
I spent 3 years in Germany and Gundelsheim has the authentic taste of real German sauerkraut.
Actual product packaging and materials may contain more and/or different information than that shown on our Web site.
Actual product packaging and materials may contain more and different information than what is shown on our website.
The uses of sauerkraut are endless- perfect with all kinds of meat from knackwurst to ham to goose; excellent with flakes of gruyere; splendid with coriander seeds, juniper berries apples, wine, cranberries; and as always, delicious with beer.
The Gundelsheim barrel sauerkraut purchased through Amazon is the best I have eaten since a child eating that made by a lady who was from Germany.
The first kraut description appears in "Le Tresor de santi" written in 1607, when it was described as shredded cabbage, packed in layers of salt and spices.
Disclaimer: While we work to ensure that product information is correct, on occasion manufacturers may alter their ingredient lists.
Sour cabbage is known to have been eaten by Chinese laborors building the Great Wall over 2,000 years ago.

Sign us up! The annual German beer festival lasts from late September through early October.
Oktoberfest means two weeks of sausage, kraut, pretzels, and beer.
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In a large bowl, combine bacon, white onion, oil, mustard and vinegar.
Heat sausages and sauerkraut according to package directions and serve with potato salad and extra mustard.
And since product formulations change, check product labels for the most recent ingredient information.
Boil potatoes (with or without peels) in salted water 15 to 20 minutes.

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Stir onions, drained sauerkraut, egg, salt, pepper, caraway, flour, and breadcrumbs into potatoes, forming a thick mixture.
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While it sits at room temperature, once each day: poke a few holes through the cabbage with the back of a wooden mixing spoon to release the gas that this process produces and pack the cabbage down tightly.
While it sits at room temperature, once each day: poke a few holes through the cabbage with the back of a wooden mixing spoon to release the gas that this process produces and pack the cabbage down tightly.
In a large silver bowl, place cabbage, carrots, 2 Tbsp sea salt and 1 Tbsp sugar and scrunch and knead it together really well for the juice to be released from the cabbage (4-5 min).
In a large silver bowl, place cabbage, carrots, 2 Tbsp sea salt and 1 Tbsp sugar and scrunch and knead it together really well for the juice to be released from the cabbage (4-5 min).
*A Note on the Cabbage: buy the ones that are light in color and NOT bright green (the light color indicates that it is a “late” in the year cabbage which works best for this recipe).
*A Note on the Cabbage: buy the ones that are light in color and NOT bright green (the light color indicates that it is a "late" in the year cabbage which works best for this recipe).
Remove the outermost leaves of the cabbage, cut it into quarters and shred cabbage finely (use a mandolin to do this if you know what’s good for you ;)).
Fill a glass jar with the cabbage mixture and pack it in very tightly so that the juice from the cabbage covers the cabbage completely.
Fill a glass jar with the cabbage mixture and pack it in very tightly so that the juice from the cabbage covers the cabbage completely.
To serve, drain the amount of cabbage that you would like to eat by firmly squeezing out the excess juice with your hands.
To serve, drain the amount of cabbage that you would like to eat by firmly squeezing out the excess juice with your hands.

Keep doing this until the sauerkraut is a lovely golden-brown throughout and all the pork products are cooked through.
Usually I'll do it more as a choucroute, with a variety of pork products (roast, sausages, and some kind of smoked pork).
Toss the well-drained sauerkraut with sliced onions; I like to add caraway seeds too.
What is the traditional German way to prepare sauerkraut? It's not as simple scoop it out of its container.
I was in Germany once and I noticed that the sauerkraut tasted significantly different than the stuff I make at home.

Pulse peeled potatoes, sauerkraut, garlic, Parmesan, salt and pepper, paprika and egg in a food processor a few times until it comes together and isn’t lumpy.
I also found out that the NIH did a study which showed cooked refrigerated and reheated potatoes have a lower glycemic index than freshly baked ones.
Serve with honey mustard or thousand island dressing as a dipping sauce if you like.

As well as the overall of cabbage it symbolises, it is like most things German decidedly regional: while friends of mine in Hamburg start slavering over the prospect of Grünkohl as soon as the clocks go back, it is utterly unknown in many other parts of Germany, while still other regions call it by different names such as Braunkohl – brown cabbage, or Krausekohl – quite literally, curly kale.
Curly kale on its own, however, is something very few north Germans have ever come into contact with, since it is only ever eaten as part of a full meal – the Grünkohlessen – chopped small and slowly simmered beyond recognition with generous slices of gammon and plenty of pork sausages, served with piles of potatoes and, most crucially, copious quantities of beer and schnapps.
The proverbial German love of sauerkraut gave them the derogatory moniker “Krauts” in English, and rarely has an insulting name been more apt: Kraut in German can mean weed, herb, and cabbage, implying that Germans see cabbage as being both widespread – like a weed – and flavoursome – like a herb.
Meanwhile, around the northern cities of Hamburg, Hannover and Bremen, another type of named-by-colour cabbage is especially popular around this time of year: Grünkohl – green cabbage, or curly kale in English.
In this way, Grünkohl plays much the same role as Haggis and Burns Night do in Scotland – and, on an interesting aside, the Scots have been the most enthusiastic English speakers when it comes to maintaining kale, the old English cognate to the German Kohl, in everyday use.

In Germany you would buy the Sauerkraut in the so-called “Reformhaus” – this is a store which has special diet, all natural and organic products; they sell normally home made Sauerkraut which is not canned, but is sold in a plastic bag or fresh from the barrel.
German Sauerkraut tastes really good together with mashed potatoes, or “Bratkartoffel” or just boiled potatoes.
– Click here for the Mashed Potatoes Recipe Slice the Kassler roast and serve with gravy, Sauerkraut and potatoes.

After bubbling stops, check container and top off with salty (1 teaspoon salt per cup of water, warm slightly to dissolve completely) water if level falls below rim.
Add filtered, or non-chlorinated, salty (1 teaspoon salt per cup of water) water to rim of jar and cap loosely with a sterilized canning lid.
More: German sauerkraut is made using salt, whereas Kimchi is made with rice wine.
Sauerkraut came to Europe via Asia, where people have been pickling cabbage for thousands of years.
In a clean, non-metallic bowl, mix cabbage, juniper berries, caraway, mustard seeds, and salt.
You will need between a 0.6% and 2% salt concentration, which equals 3/4 to 2 teaspoons of table salt per pound of prepared cabbage.

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