how to buy a used car nj

If you did not get a title from a dealer, you must title your vehicle within 10 days of purchase or face a penalty fee.
If you are a New Jersey resident and purchased your vehicle out-of-state, you will need to follow a special procedure [119k pdf].

If you wish to claim exemptions other than the ones below, contact MVC Sales Section of the Division of at (609) 292-6400.
Visit the NJ Divison of Taxation website for details on motor vehicle casual sales notices.
Important note: The titled owner (seller) must enter "gift" as the sale price on the New Jersey title.
If the information on the title appears to be changed or altered, additional documentation may be required by the Motor Vehicle Commission.
You must transfer the vehicle title in person at your local New Jersey MVC office within 10 business days from the purchase date.
When buying a vehicle in New Jersey, be sure to get some important paperwork from the seller, such as a bill of sale, the vehicle title, and an odometer reading statement.
The New Jersey MVC will issue you new license plates for your vehicle, unless you choose to transfer the license plates from your previous car.
Finally, you’ll take these documents and a few others to your nearest New Jersey Motor Vehicle Commission (MVC) office to register your vehicle.
When you buy a used car in New Jersey, the dealer or seller of the vehicle must provide you with specific documents.
You can transfer your title and register your vehicle at the same time at your local NJ MVC office.
You’ll need to visit your local Motor Vehicle Commission (MVC) Agency and apply for a New Jersey registration and title.
Be sure to bring the current title (signed over to you) or the manufacturer’s certificate of origin, as well as the bill of sale, a current odometer reading, and the Vehicle Identification Number.
Then, call the central MVC office in New Jersey (not your local office) at (609) 292-6500 or (888) 486-3339 to get specific information about your particular vehicle, and the requirements for where you live.
New Jersey residents who buy new passenger vehicles (motorcycles are not included) are required to register their vehicles for 4 years at a time, paying the full fees for the entire period.
The New Jersey MVC has a detailed list of fees on its website to help you determine the amount you’ll pay when registering and titling your vehicle.
By using this service, you accept the terms of our Visitor Agreement.
"AutoTrader.com" is a registered trademark of TPI Holdings, Inc.
We’re sorry; we couldn’t find the ZIP code entered.
My advice is that you should consider buying a new car that fits in you budget so that you will be covered by the manufacturer’s warranty if there are any problems.
The companies do usually follow the recommended maintenance so the key components like the engine are probably in better condition than cars owned by private people.
In general, you will pay at least 2% higher APR for a used car than you would on a new car loan but you can offset this by using an online lender that specialized in financing used cars such as the ones we recommend.
Since you are normally buying a used car "As Is," you will want to know about any problems before the purchase.
In addition to the steps required to get a good deal on a new car, when buying a used vehicle there are additional steps you must be aware of.
Out of all the steps to buying a used car, the one-on-one negotiation is the most daunting! You need to use all of the available information to your advantage to drive the price down.
Buying a used car can be a tricky process to navigate because no two cars are the same.
The CarBuyingTips.com "Used Car Bill Of Sale Form" is a useful free spreadsheet (actually 2 forms in one) to help you finalize the sale.
I get a ton of emails from people that ended up buying a used car and later finding out it had been wrecked.
You should pay with a credit card if possible or a check of some type (personal, official check, etc.). With a credit card or check you have a paper trail and some recourse available if something goes wrong.
We’ve seen certified pre-owned luxury cars that have been previously wrecked or have other problems.
It gives you the ability to run as many reports as you want for 60 days so you will be able to compare the histories of any cars you are considering.
Rebuilt Superstorm Sandy cars are just now "flooding" the market.
The rental companies tend to take cars out of service after a year or two so you will be getting a relatively new car that has been well maintained.
The dealers like to advertise things like 175 point inspections but in reality these don’t mean much and they really don’t do much to recondition the cars other than normal detailing.
(%) Year householder moved into unit – Moved in 1999 to March 2000 (%) Year householder moved into unit – Moved in 1995 to 1998 (%) Year householder moved into unit – Moved in 1990 to 1994 (%) Year householder moved into unit – Moved in 1980 to 1989 (%) Year householder moved into unit – Moved in 1970 to 1979 (%) Year householder moved into unit – Moved in 1969 or earlier (%) Means of transportation to work – Drove car alone (%) Means of transportation to work – Carpooled (%) Means of transportation to work – Public transportation (%) Means of transportation to work – Bus or trolley bus (%) Means of transportation to work – Streetcar or trolley car (%) Means of transportation to work – Subway or elevated (%) Means of transportation to work – Railroad (%) Means of transportation to work – Ferryboat (%) Means of transportation to work – Taxicab (%) Means of transportation to work – Motorcycle (%) Means of transportation to work – Bicycle (%) Means of transportation to work – Walked (%) Means of transportation to work – Other means (%) Working at home (%) Industry diversity Common Industries – Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting, and mining (%) Common Industries – Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting (%) Common Industries – Mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction (%) Common Industries – Construction (%) Common Industries – Manufacturing (%) Common Industries – Wholesale trade (%) Common Industries – Retail trade (%) Common Industries – Transportation and warehousing, and utilities (%) Common Industries – Transportation and warehousing (%) Common Industries – Utilities (%) Common Industries – Information (%) Common Industries – Finance and insurance, and and rental and leasing (%) Common Industries – Finance and insurance (%) Common Industries – and rental and leasing (%) Common Industries – Professional, scientific, and management, and administrative and waste management services (%) Common Industries – Professional, scientific, and technical services (%) Common Industries – Management of companies and enterprises (%) Common Industries – Administrative and support and waste management services (%) Common Industries – Educational services, and health care and social assistance (%) Common Industries – Educational services (%) Common Industries – Health care and social assistance (%) Common Industries – Arts, entertainment, and recreation, and accommodation and food services (%) Common Industries – Arts, entertainment, and recreation (%) Common Industries – Accommodation and food services (%) Common Industries – Other services, except public administration (%) Common Industries – Public administration (%) Occupation diversity Common Occupations – Management, professional, and related occupations (%) Common Occupations – Management, business, and financial occupations (%) Common Occupations – Management occupations (%) Common Occupations – Business and financial operations occupations (%) Common Occupations – Professional and related occupations (%) Common Occupations – Computer and mathematical occupations (%) Common Occupations – Architecture and engineering occupations (%) Common Occupations – Life, physical, and social science occupations (%) Common Occupations – Community and social services occupations (%) Common Occupations – Legal occupations (%) Common Occupations – Education, training, and library occupations (%) Common Occupations – Arts, design, entertainment, sports, and media occupations (%) Common Occupations – Healthcare practitioner and technical occupations (%) Common Occupations – Health diagnosing and treating practitioners and other technical occupations (%) Common Occupations – Health technologists and technicians (%) Common Occupations – Service occupations (%) Common Occupations – Healthcare support occupations (%) Common Occupations – Protective service occupations (%) Common Occupations – Fire fighting and prevention, and other protective service workers(%) Common Occupations – enforcement workers including supervisors (%) Common Occupations – Food preparation and serving related occupations (%) Common Occupations – Building and grounds cleaning and maintenance occupations (%) Common Occupations – Personal care and service occupations (%) Common Occupations – Sales and office occupations (%) Common Occupations – Sales and related occupations (%) Common Occupations – Office and administrative support occupations (%) Common Occupations – Farming, fishing, and forestry occupations (%) Common Occupations – Construction, extraction, maintenance, and repair occupations (%) Common Occupations – Construction and extraction occupations (%) Common Occupations – Installation, maintenance, and repair occupations (%) Common Occupations – Production, transportation, and material moving occupations (%) Common Occupations – Production occupations (%) Common Occupations – Transportation and material moving occupations (%) Common Occupations – Supervisors, transportation and material moving workers(%) Common Occupations – Motor vehicle operators (%) Common Occupations – Material moving workers (%) People in Group quarters – Institutionalized population (%) People in Group quarters – Correctional institutions (%) People in Group quarters – Federal prisons and detention centers (%) People in Group quarters – Halfway houses (%) People in Group quarters – Local jails and other confinement facilities (including police lockups) (%) People in Group quarters – Military disciplinary barracks (%) People in Group quarters – State prisons (%) People in Group quarters – Other types of correctional institutions (%) People in Group quarters – Nursing homes (%) People in Group quarters – Hospitals/wards, hospices, and schools for the handicapped (%) People in Group quarters – Hospitals/wards and hospices for chronically ill (%) People in Group quarters – Hospices or homes for chronically ill (%) People in Group quarters – Military hospitals or wards for chronically ill (%) People in Group quarters – Other hospitals or wards for chronically ill (%) People in Group quarters – Hospitals or wards for drug/alcohol abuse (%) People in Group quarters – Mental (Psychiatric) hospitals or wards (%) People in Group quarters – Schools, hospitals, or wards for the mentally retarded (%) People in Group quarters – Schools, hospitals, or wards for the physically handicapped (%) People in Group quarters – Institutions for the deaf (%) People in Group quarters – Institutions for the blind (%) People in Group quarters – Orthopedic wards and institutions for the physically handicapped (%) People in Group quarters – Wards in general hospitals for patients who have no usual home elsewhere (%) People in Group quarters – Wards in military hospitals for patients who have no usual home elsewhere (%) People in Group quarters – Juvenile institutions (%) People in Group quarters – Long-term care (%) People in Group quarters – Homes for abused, dependent, and neglected children (%) People in Group quarters – Residential treatment centers for emotionally disturbed children (%) People in Group quarters – Training schools for juvenile delinquents (%) People in Group quarters – Short-term care, detention or diagnostic centers for delinquent children (%) People in Group quarters – Type of juvenile institution unknown (%) People in Group quarters – Noninstitutionalized population (%) People in Group quarters – College dormitories (includes college quarters off campus) (%) People in Group quarters – Military quarters (%) People in Group quarters – On base (%) People in Group quarters – Barracks, unaccompanied personnel housing (UPH), (Enlisted/Officer) (%) People in Group quarters – Transient quarters for temporary residents (%) People in Group quarters – Military ships (%) People in Group quarters – Group homes (%) People in Group quarters – Homes or halfway houses for drug/alcohol abuse (%) People in Group quarters – Homes for the mentally ill (%) People in Group quarters – Homes for the mentally retarded (%) People in Group quarters – Homes for the physically handicapped (%) People in Group quarters – Other group homes (%) People in Group quarters – Religious group quarters (%) People in Group quarters – Dormitories (%) People in Group quarters – Agriculture workers’ dormitories on farms (%) People in Group quarters – Job Corps and vocational training facilities (%) People in Group quarters – Other workers’ dormitories (%) People in Group quarters – Crews of maritime vessels (%) People in Group quarters – Other nonhousehold living situations (%) People in Group quarters – Other noninstitutional group quarters (%) Density of houses Urban houses (%) Rural houses (%) Residents speaking English at home (%) Residents speaking English at home – Born in the United States (%) Residents speaking English at home – Native, born elsewhere (%) Residents speaking English at home – Foreign born (%) Residents speaking Spanish at home (%) Residents speaking Spanish at home – Born in the United States (%) Residents speaking Spanish at home – Native, born elsewhere (%) Residents speaking Spanish at home – Foreign born (%) Residents speaking other language at home (%) Residents speaking other language at home – Born in the United States (%) Residents speaking other language at home – Native, born elsewhere (%) Residents speaking other language at home – Foreign born (%) Class of Workers – Employee of private company (%) Class of Workers – Self-employed in own incorporated business (%) Class of Workers – Private not-for-profit wage and salary workers (%) Class of Workers – Local government workers (%) Class of Workers – State government workers (%) Class of Workers – Federal government workers (%) Class of Workers – Self-employed workers in own not incorporated business and Unpaid family workers (%) House heating fuel used in houses and condos – Utility gas (%) House heating fuel used in houses and condos – Bottled, tank, or LP gas (%) House heating fuel used in houses and condos – Electricity (%) House heating fuel used in houses and condos – Fuel oil, kerosene, etc.
You will take the temporary insurance card, the title and the bill of sale to DMV where after filling out a registration form and paying sales tax, you will be given a set plates for the car.
  Straight Dope Message Board > Main > General Questions Need info on buying a used car in NJ: plates, registration, etc.
The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of New Jersey On-Line LLC.
Sansone Jr.’s EZ Auto Center is a Keyport NJ Used Car dealer committed to delivering excellent customer service and the right used car at the right price.
Sansone Jr.’s EZ Auto Center welcomes you to browse the many helpful auto shopping tools and resources you can use on this website to help you find the car you are looking for.
Our professional staff, with years of training and experience, is here to make your visit with us one that will make you a loyal Jr.’s EZ Auto Center customer.
Our New Jersey car dealerships are conveniently located in Waterford and Blackwood, Camden County, and have a huge selection of quality pre-owned vehicles. For your convenience, you can browse the inventory, get a used car appraisal and even apply for a loan from the comfort of your home.
1 Price Change, reduced by $300 Dealer Analysis Ramsey Corp.
1 Price Change, reduced by $800 Dealer Analysis Ramsey Corp.
You’re using a web browser that isn’t supported by Facebook.
For example, we serve many Kia shoppers in the Toms River, NJ area every month, and sell a lot of used cars in New Jersey as a whole.
You have to do tons of research to figure out what kind of vehicle you are looking for, and then put in lots of time trying to find a used car dealership in New Jersey that has it in stock.
You can view our whole stock of used cars in Lakewood, NJ right on our website, but then you might miss out on all the trade-ins that we got that day.
Another great aspect of having cars for sale in NJ is that we are able to serve so many different communities because of how compact the state is.
Kia and GMC both create some of the best cars on the road today, and you will be very happy with our purchase from our Lakewood, NJ auto sales department.
Call our friendly staff today or visit us at our convenient Route 42/Black Horse Pike location to learn about our latest Audi specials – with inventory of the 2010 A4 and on-hand availability of the Audi Q5, we are prepared for you to demo a car, get details on any vehicle, request a brochure, discuss your trade-in or even talk financing on your next car.
GetCashForYourCar.Com strive to provide #1 trusted customer service in a car buying industry of New Jersey, we make sure you’ll get a fair market price for your used car and walk away with payment in just 20 minutes.
Vehicle prices and details are subject to change without notice and may not include additional fees and taxes, including financing, registration, and processing fees.
Vehicle Internet price is subject to change dependent upon offered financing and without prior notice.

Tags: , ,