hr giger

Cheers to the aliens: Sci-Fi Hotel, Giger Bar coming to US? Sci-Fi Hotel founder Andy Davies teams up with "Alien" artist H.R. Giger to open a hotel bar, yet where it will land is still unknown.
One "Giger Bar" sprang up in Tokyo, but the realization of his designs were a great disappointment to the artist, since the Japanese organization behind the venture did not wait for his final designs, but decided to move ahead with nothing more than Giger’s rough preliminary sketches.
Giger, Swiss Artist, Dies at 74; His Vision Gave Life to ‘Alien’ Creature".
His books of paintings, particularly Necronomicon and Necronomicon II (1985) and the frequent appearance of his art in Omni magazine continued his rise to international prominence.[6] Giger is also well known for artwork on several music recording albums.
At The Limelight in Manhattan, Giger’s artwork was licensed to decorate the VIP room, the uppermost chapel of the landmarked church, but it was never intended to be a permanent installation and bore no similarity to the real Giger Bars in Switzerland.
Within a few years, the establishment was out of business.[13] The two Giger Bars in his native Switzerland (in Gruyères and Chur), however, were built under Giger’s close personal supervision and reflect his original concepts for them accurately.
"’Alien’ artist H.R. Giger dies at 74".
Giger created furniture designs, particularly the Harkonnen Capo Chair for a movie of the novel Dune that was to be directed by Alejandro Jodorowsky.
Giger’s most distinctive stylistic innovation was that of a representation of human bodies and machines in a cold, interconnected relationship, he described as "biomechanical".
Many years later, David Lynch directed the film, using only rough concepts by Giger.
Gary Singh, "Giger Harvest", Silicon Alleys, Metro Silicon Valley, 8–14 July 2009, p.
Giger was born in 1940 in Chur, capital city of Graubünden, the largest and easternmost Swiss canton.
Giger is often referred to in popular culture, especially in science fiction and cyberpunk.
"’Alien’ creator H.R. Giger is dead".
Giger had a relationship with Swiss actress and muse Li Tobler until she committed suicide in 1975.
Sheldon Teitelbaum, "Giger’s Necronomicon Imagery Comes Alive on the Screen", Cinefantastique vol.
For most of his career, Giger had worked predominantly in airbrush, creating monochromatic canvasses depicting surreal, nightmarish dreamscapes.
Giger applied his biomechanical style to interior design.
a b c d e f Hans Ruedi Giger, HR Giger ARh+, translated by Karen Williams, Taschen, 1993.

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H.R. Giger was born on February 5, 1940 in Chur, Switzerland as Hans Rudolf Giger.
Trivia: Giger was in a relationship with Swiss actress Li Tobler until she committed suicide in 1975.
He is known for his work on Alien³ (1992), Alien (1979) and Aliens (1986).

Giger H.

In a swissinfo.ch report to mark Giger’s 70th birthday, Tobia Bezzola, curator of Zurich’s fine arts museum, said he appreciated Giger and worked with him on two exhibitions at the museum in 1995 and 2005.
In a swissinfo.ch report to mark Giger’s 70th birthday, Tobia Bezzola, curator of Zurich’s fine arts museum, said he appreciated Giger and worked with him on two exhibitions at the museum in 1995 and 2005.
In the art world, Giger is appreciated for his wide body of work in the fantastic realism and surrealistic genres.
In the art world, Giger is appreciated for his wide body of work in the fantastic realism and surrealistic genres.

Giger continued to work on the Alien franchise, but his art found its way into corners of pop culture as diverse as the video game Dark Seed, the cover of Debbie Harry’s solo album Koo Koo, and Korn singer Jonathan Davis’ microphone stand.
He developed a freehand airbrush painting style that he used to great effect in his "biomechanical" landscape artworks, and was tapped to work on Alejandro Jodorowsky’s ambitious, doomed remake of Dune in 1975, but Giger gained a new level of recognition following the publication of his book Necronomicon in 1977.
H.R. Giger, the Swiss surrealist artist best known for designing the iconic "xenomorph" creature in the Alien movie franchise, has died.
The Alien creature was based on a Giger print named "Necronom IV", and marked a major departure from the clichéd green men often seen in movies until then.

(Its own director, Ridley Scott, called it "a C-movie done in an A-way".) Chief among them was the visceral and disquieting design work by the Swiss surrealist artist HR Giger, who has died aged 74 from injuries sustained in a fall.
Both men had been collaborating in the late 1970s with the cult director Alejandro Jodorowsky on an adaptation of Frank Herbert’s science-fiction epic Dune, which was never made (though Giger’s designs for the abandoned project can be seen in a 2013 documentary called Jodorowsky’s Dune).
His fame increased following the release of Alien, and he took on occasional and usually unfulfilling work on other films, among them Poltergeist II: The Other Side (1986), the Alien-influenced Species (1995) and the 1996 German horror-comedy Killer Condom (tagline: "The rubber that rubs you out!").
Giger’s designs were central to each of those sequels, as well as two crossovers with the Predator franchise – Alien vs Predator (2004) and Alien vs Predator: Requiem (2007).
O’Bannon introduced Giger’s 1977 book Necronomicon to Scott, who seized in particular upon the painting Necronom IV, and commissioned him to design a creature based on this.

His paintings grace the covers of death metal trailblazers Celtic Frost’s 1985 album To Mega Therion, Danzig’s 1992 LP Danzig III: How the Gods Kill, melodic death metal group Carcass’ 1993 record Heartwork, Emerson, Lake and Palmer’s 1998 live album Then and Now, and the two most recent albums by Triptykon, a death-metal band formed by Celtic Frost’s Tom Fischer.
Surrealist painter Hans Ruedi Giger, whose designs inspired the creature in Alien and whose otherworldly and often grotesque art graced album covers for Emerson, Lake and Palmer, Debbie Harry and Danzig, died Monday, following hospitalization for falling down the stairs in his Zurich home.

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Giger, who was born Hans Rudolf in the eastern Swiss town of Chur in 1940, died on Monday in Zurich from injuries he obtained after suffering a fall, an employee of the H.R. Giger Museum said, confirming reports in Swiss media.
ZURICH (Reuters) – Swiss surrealist artist H.R. Giger who designed the monster and revolutionary sci-fi sets for the film "Alien" has died, his museum said on Tuesday.
Giger was also known for his sculptures, paintings and furniture and many of these works are on display at his own museum in a medieval castle in Gruyeres, central Switzerland, which is run by his second wife Carmen Maria Scheifele Giger.

BERLIN (AP) — Swiss artist H.R. Giger, who designed the creature in Ridley Scott’s sci-fi horror classic "Alien," has died at age 74 from injuries suffered in a fall, his museum said Tuesday.
Giger went on to work as a set designer for Hollywood, contributing to "Species," ”Poltergeist II," ”Dune," and most famously "Alien," for which he received a 1979 Academy Award for special effects.
The image of a brooding, mysterious artist was nurtured by Giger working only at night, keeping his curtains permanently drawn and dressing mainly in black — a habit he acquired while working as a draftsman because it made Indian ink stains stand out less on his clothes.
Giger’s vision of a human skull encased in a machine appeared on the cover of "Brain Salad Surgery," a 1973 album by the rock band Emerson, Lake and Palmer.
Sandra Mivelaz, administrator of the H.R. Giger museum in Gruyeres, western Switzerland, told The Associated Press that Giger died in a hospital on Monday.
Giger’s works, often showing macabre scenes of humans and machines fused into hellish hybrids, influenced a generation of movie directors and inspired an enduring fashion for "biomechanical" tattoos.
A collection of his early work, "Ein Fressen fuer den Psychiater" — "A Feast for the Psychiatrist" — used mainly ink and oil, but Giger soon discovered the airbrush and pioneered his own freehand technique.
"My paintings seem to make the strongest impression on people who are, well, who are crazy," Giger said in a 1979 interview with Starlog magazine.
His designs were exhibited more frequently in "Alien" theme bars, short-lived Giger museums and at tattoo conventions than in established art galleries.
Frequently frustrated by the Hollywood production process, Giger eventually disowned much of the work that was attributed to him on screen.

Alien director Sir Ridley Scott has paid tribute to Swiss artist HR Giger, who has died aged 74 – describing him as "a true original".
Born in 1940, Hans "Ruedi" Giger studied architecture and industrial design in Zurich and was known for creating strange dreamscapes.
A statement from Giger's family said: "We are absolutely heartbroken over the loss of this loving husband, selfless friend and supremely talented artist.
"As much as Giger shunned the limelight, preferring his work to speak for him, he was greatly appreciative of every compliment he ever received and we know he would be amazed and humbled by the kindness that continues to be the subject of his eulogies.

Giger’s remarkable book of the dead gives us some of the most powerful images ever an artist drew from the well of the imagination.
Giger’s remarkable book of the dead gives us some of the most powerful images ever an artist drew from the well of the imagination.
H.R. Giger’s work has, in my opinion, the distinction of being the most disturbing art embraced by the public since that of Hieronymous Bosch.
After having seen some of Giger’s work in Alien and some other more well know work I decided to buy Biomechanics.
The second Necronomicon volume is a worthy companion to this one, but if you must have only one Giger book this is the one I recommend.
"H.R. GIGER’S NECRONOMICON: A startling milestone on the darkly lit road once traveled by the likes of Bosch, Brueghel, Lovecraft, Poe and Kafka.
"H.R. GIGER’S NECRONOMICON: A startling milestone on the darkly lit road once traveled by the likes of Bosch, Brueghel, Lovecraft, Poe and Kafka.
The look and feel of the world comes from this Swiss artist, who has this book to help explain his work.
Here is an excellent foundation of H.R. Giger’s work for those sci-fi die-hards who appreciate intense subjects in both text and art.
Although Giger does employ perspective in his work, it is often relatively simplistic, as are the general profiles of his byzantine compositions.
5.0 out of 5 stars Crass, penetrating, bedrock samples of Giger’s macabre work.

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Maria von Trapp, seen here posing with a photo of her family, was the last of the singing siblings immortalized in the movie "The Sound of Music." She died February 18 of natural causes at her Vermont home, according to her family.
Geoffrey Holder, a versatile artist known for his ability as a dancer, actor and — most famously to most of America — a pitchman for 7Up, died from complications due to pneumonia, his family’s attorney said on Monday, October 6.
Singer George Hamilton IV, known as the "International Ambassador of Country Music," died at a Nashville hospital on September 17 following a heart attack, the Grand Ole Opry said in a press release.
Veteran actor Ralph Waite died at 85 on February 13, according to an accountant for the Waite family and a church where the actor was a regular member.
Character actor Eli Wallach, seen here in "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly," died on June 24, according to a family member who did not want to be named.
(CNN) — H.R. Giger, the Swiss surrealist artist whose works of sexual-industrial imagery and design of the eponymous creature in the "Alien" movies were known around the world, has died.
Actress Sheila MacRae, who portrayed Alice Kramden in a 1960s revival of "The Honeymooners" on "The Jackie Gleason Show," died on March 6, according to her family.
H.R. Giger, the Swiss surrealist artist whose works of sexual-industrial imagery and design of the eponymous creature in the "Alien" movies were known around the world, died on May 12.
James Shigeta, a prolific and pioneering Asian-American actor whose 50-year career included the movies "Die Hard" and "Flower Drum Song," died in his sleep in Los Angeles on July 28, his agent said.
Joan Mondale, the wife of former Vice President Walter Mondale, died on February 3, according to a statement from the family’s church.
Richard Kiel, the actor best known for playing the James Bond villain "Jaws," died September 10 at a California hospital, St.
Rosemary Murphy, an Emmy Award-winning actress known for her roles in the movie "To Kill a Mockingbird" as well as TV soap operas "All My Children" and "Another World," died July 5 at the age of 89.
Franklin McCain, seen center wearing glasses, one of the "Greensboro Four," who made history for their 1960 sit-in at a Greensboro Woolworth’s lunch counter, died on January 10 after a brief illness, according to his alma mater, North Carolina A&T State University.
Legendary folk singer Pete Seeger, known for classics such as "Where Have All the Flowers Gone" and "If I Had a Hammer (The Hammer Song)," died of natural causes in New York on January 27, his grandson told CNN.
Grammy-winning jazz bassist Charlie Haden, whose music career spanned seven decades and several genres, died July 11, according to his publicist.
Emmy-winning actress Polly Bergen, whose TV and movie career spanned more than six decades, died on September 20, according to her publicist.
Theodore "Dutch" Van Kirk, the last crewman of the U.S. plane that dropped the first atomic bomb over Hiroshima, Japan, in 1945, died of natural causes on July 28, according to his daughter Vicki Triplett.
Nadine Gordimer, a South African author who won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1991, died on July 13, according to her family.
Actress Arlene Martel, whom "Star Trek" fans knew as Spock’s bride-to-be, died in a Los Angeles hospital August 12 after complications from a heart attack, her son said.
Drummer Tommy Ramone, the last living original member of the pioneering punk band The Ramones, died on July 11, according to the band’s Facebook page.
Jack" Ramsay, who became a television analyst years after winning a league championship with the Portland Trail Blazers, died on April 28, according to his longtime employer ESPN.
Renowned conductor Lorin Maazel died from complications of pneumonia on July 13, according to his family.
Paul Revere, leader of the 1960s rock band Paul Revere and the Raiders, died Saturday, October 4, at his home in Idaho, according to the the band’s website.
Kate O’Mara, the British actress best known for playing Joan Collins’ sister on the 1980s show "Dynasty," died March 30.
Oscar-nominated British actor Bob Hoskins, known for roles in "Who Framed Roger Rabbit" and "Mona Lisa," died April 29 at age 71, his publicist said.
Walter Dean Myers, a beloved author of children’s books, died on July 1 following a brief illness, according to the Children’s Book Council.
Ed Nelson, best known for playing a doctor in the 1960s nighttime soap opera "Peyton Place," died on August 13, his family said.
Rubin "Hurricane" Carter, the middleweight boxing contender who was wrongly convicted of a triple murder in New Jersey in the 1960s, died April 20 at the age of 76, according to Win Wahrer, the director of client services for the Association in Defence of the Wrongly Convicted.
Comedian David Brenner, a regular on Johnny Carson’s "The Tonight Show," died after a battle with cancer, a family spokesman said March 15.
John Henson, the son of Jim Henson who is perhaps most notable for his portrayal of Sweetums on "The Muppets," died after a "sudden, massive heart attack," his family’s company said on February 15.
Jose Luis "Cheo" Feliciano, a giant of salsa music and a Puerto Rican legend, died in a car crash April 18 in San Juan, Puerto Rico, according to police.
James Garner, the understated, wisecracking everyman actor who enjoyed multigenerational success on both the small and big screens, died of natural causes on July 19.
Major League Baseball Hall of Famer Tony Gwynn died June 16 at the age of 54, according to a release from the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.
According to her longtime friend Julie Keyes, Stritch died at her home in Birmingham, Michigan, surrounded by her family.
Richard Percy Jones, the actor who gave Pinocchio his voice in the 1940 Disney movie, died at his California home on July 8.
Actor Charles Keating, who had been fighting lung cancer for several years, died on August 8, his son Sean Keating said.
Legendary soul singer Bobby Womack died June 27, according to Womack’s publicist.
British actor and comedian Rik Mayall, who appeared in the TV series "Blackadder," died June 9 at the age of 56, his agent said.
Devo guitarist Bob Casale, known by fans as "Bob 2," died February 17, his brother and band mate announced.
Joan Rivers, the sassy comedian whose gossipy "can we talk" persona catapulted her into a career as a headlining talk-show host, best-selling author and red-carpet maven, died September 4.
Olympian and World War II hero Louis Zamperini, the subject of the book and upcoming film "Unbroken," died July 2 after a recent battle with pneumonia.
Actor, writer and director Harold Ramis, seen here on the far left with fellow "Ghostbusters" Dan Aykroyd and Bill Murray, died at his Chicago-area home on February 24.
Al Feldstein, who guided Mad magazine for almost three decades as its editor, died on April 29, according to a Montana funeral home.
Actress Lauren Bacall, the husky-voiced Hollywood icon known for her sultry sensuality, died on August 12.
Ariel Sharon, whose half century as a military and political leader in Israel was marked with victories and controversies, died on January 11 after eight years in a coma, Israeli Army Radio reported.
Paul Mazursky, a five-time Oscar nominee who directed and wrote such films as "Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice," "An Unmarried Woman" and "Down and Out in Beverly Hills," died at the age of 84, his agent said July 1.
Spanish guitarist Paco de Lucia, seen here in 2006, died February 25 of an apparent heart attack.
Actor and comedian Robin Williams died at his Northern California home on August 11.
Country singer Kevin Sharp died from "complications due to cancer" on April 19, his mother told CNN.
Jimi Jamison, lead singer of the 1980s rock band Survivor, died at the age of 63, it was announced September 2.
Actor Meshach Taylor died June 28 at his Los Angeles-area home, his agent, Dede Binder, said.
Journalist Garrick Utley died at age 74 following a long battle with cancer, his wife of 40 years said in February.
Skateboarding legend Jay Adams died of a heart attack August 14 while vacationing in Mexico with his wife.
JJ Murphy, an actor who was set to join the "Game of Thrones" cast, died August 8, his agent said.
Northern Ireland’s former first minister and former Democratic Unionist Party leader Ian Paisley has died, his wife, Eileen, said in a statement on September 12.
Blues guitarist and singer Johnny Winter died July 16 in a Swiss hotel room, his representative said.
Ruby Dee, an award-winning actress whose seven-decade career included triumphs on stage and screen, died June 12.
Chester Nez, the last of the original Navajo code talkers credited with creating an unbreakable code used during World War II, died June 5 at his home in Albuquerque, New Mexico, the Navajo Nation President said.
Maximilian Schell died on February 1 in a Austrian hospital with his wife by his side, his agent Patricia Baumbauer said.
James Brady, the former White House press secretary who was severely wounded in a 1981 assassination attempt on President Ronald Reagan, has died, the White House said on August 4.
Australian racing legend Jack Brabham died on May 19, according to Brabham’s son David.
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Days after being inducted into World Wrestling Entertainment’s Hall of Fame, WWE superstar Ultimate Warrior died April 8.
James Rebhorn, whose acting resume includes a long list of character roles in major films and TV shows, died March 21, his representative said.
Former Barcelona soccer coach Tito Vilanova, who had been battling cancer, died at the age of 45, the club announced April 25.
Eileen Ford, who founded the Ford Model Agency 70 years ago, died July 9 at the age of 92, the company said.
Drummer Scott Asheton, who co-founded and played drums for the influential proto-punk band The Stooges, died March 15.

Surrealist Swiss painter H.R. Giger, who died on May 12th at age 74, is perhaps best known for inspiring the design of the creature in the Alien movie franchise, also had a long and deep connection with music.
Whether via commissioned pieces or licensing deals, his disturbing, erotic "bio-mechanical" images were frequently used for album cover art, among other musically-related projects.
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BERLIN (AP) — Swiss artist H.R. Giger, who designed the creature in Ridley Scott’s sci-fi horror classic "Alien," has died at age 74 from injuries suffered in a fall, his museum said Tuesday.
Giger’s works, often showing macabre scenes of humans and machines fused into hellish hybrids, influenced a generation of movie directors and inspired an enduring fashion for "biomechanical" tattoos.
Giger’s works, often showing macabre scenes of humans and machines fused into hellish hybrids, influenced a generation of movie directors and inspired an enduring fashion for "biomechanical" tattoos.
Sandra Mivelaz, administrator of the H.R. Giger museum in Gruyeres, western Switzerland, told The Associated Press that Giger died in a hospital on Monday.
Giger went on to work as a set designer for Hollywood, contributing to "Species," ”Poltergeist II," ”Dune," and most famously "Alien," for which he received a 1979 Academy Award for special effects.
H.R. Giger, who designed the creature in Ridley Scott’s sci-fi horror classic "Alien," has died at age 74 from injuries suffered in a fall.

However, directly because of the failed project, Giger was hired a few years later by Ridley Scott to work on Alien, a film that involved a number of other Dune alums, including scriptwriter Dan O’Bannon.
Giger provided visual design assistance to a score of additional movies, sending designs to 20th Century Fox during Alien 3’s tortured development and providing a huge amount of design work for 1995’s Species, but continued to find interacting with Hollywood difficult and frustrating.
Giger did a number of designs for the film, most notably the Harkonnen world of Giedi Prime, but his first introduction to Hollywood was ultimately a failure–after a few years and a few million dollars, production on Jodorowsky’s Dune spectacularly imploded, leaving behind some fantastic stories and an enduring legacy, but no movie.
Alien itself became a benchmark in science fiction and horror, and Giger’s work on the film tapped into something primal and terrifying; the creature in the film is itself an iconic design, mixing together unsettling pseudo-sexual visual cues together with good old-fashioned scary grossness.

Swiss artist H.R. Giger, seen here at his "Dreams and Visions" exhibition in 2011, died Monday after a fall in Zurich.
Swiss artist H.R. Giger, seen here at his "Dreams and Visions" exhibition in 2011, died Monday after a fall in Zurich.
Update at 4:51 p.m. EDT: All Things Considered talked to Giger’s friend and publisher James Cowan, who said the artist’s work was inspired by his dreams.
You might not know the name, but you probably know the work: H.R. Giger created some of the most powerfully creepy visuals in Hollywood’s history, including animals and props that forced some viewers of 1979’s sci-fi film Alien to watch the film through their fingers.
Last year Giger was inducted into the Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame and Cowan says he will go down as one of the great surrealists of our time.
He published Giger’s art books for more than 20 years and says while he is best known for designing scary creatures in Hollywood, he was also a very skilled artist with a passion for surrealism.
Giger’s work includes designs for the 1979 film Alien.
Giger’s work includes designs for the 1979 film Alien.
In a career that spanned decades, Giger reflected humanity’s increasingly close (and sometimes fearful) relationship with machines, creating work that seamlessly melds the organic with the mechanical.
Hans Rudolf Giger was 74; he died in Zurich from injuries suffered in a fall, a representative of the H.R. Giger Museum in Gruyeres, Switzerland, tells the AP.
"Giger’s vision of a human skull encased in a machine appeared on the cover of Brain Salad Surgery, a 1973 album by the rock band Emerson, Lake and Palmer.

Giger’s Batmobile is unmistakably a Giger design: a slightly unsettling mix of biology and technology, full of ribbed tubes and vertebra and, if Giger’s past work is any indicator, probably more than a few hidden penises.
His unique "X" shaped design was to include articulated front legs/mandibles, retractable fins, and gatling gun emplacements on each of the four pods on the sides of the vehicle.
H.R. Giger was contacted in 1994 to design a Batmobile for Batman Forver.
Looking at the sketches, it looks like a pair of scissors was actually an inspiration for the design, and the end result is pretty tough-looking, with a pair of mean-looking mandibles up front that can open and close.

Swiss artist H.R. Giger, made famous for his work designing the iconic creatures in the Aliens series, has passed away at the age of 74.

After my prior cooperation on the film in 1975 with Jodorowsky, I had started working together with Conny de Fries on the prototype of a bed I had designed, as part of a furniture project I always hoped to realize.
"Dali, however, showed a polite interest in my work and introduced his wife Gala, describing her as a specialist in monsters and nightmares whose external appearance completely belied her inner world, Gala then expressed the opinion that I would only need to wear a mask in order to completely match the world of my pictures, and this lead her into an hour-long diatribe against the evils of the world, of which she had years of experience.
"On returning to Switzerland I was astonished to receive a telephone call from one of Jodorowsky’s assistants saying that i should produce a view of the castle on the planet we had spoken about, 55 x 65 cm, and bring it to Paris, where they would look at it and see if it was suitable for the film.
The bed was never completed but my involvement with the renewed Dune project provided the opportunity to construct my designs as the Harkonnen furniture pieces and to also have them featured in the film.
It was a project for a three hour 70 mm science fiction film, in which Dali was to play a leading role for a fee of $100,000 an hour (he was later invited to leave the film because of his pro-Franco statements).

Giger, creator of the terrifying life forms and their otherworldly environment in the film classic ALIEN, for which he received the Oscar in 1980.
Fundamental to the nature of his work is his Biomechanical aesthetic, a dialectic between man and machine, representing a universe at once disturbing and sublime.
Painter, sculptor, designer, interior architect, Giger extends his artistic vision into all domains.
Welcome to the Webstore of HRGiger.com, one of the three official websites of the acclaimed Swiss surrealist H.

To celebrate his life and career, here’s a showcase of the most incredible (and unnerving) artworks of H.R. Giger.
Darkseed, a horror point-and-click adventure game H.R. Giger worked on, released for Amiga and DOS in 1992.

It was certainly a creation which Giger prized, much as he took great pride in his collaboration with myriads of music industry and film artists, since he began his glorious journey as a world class painter, sculptor and designer.
It is the official supplement to the artist’s own website, , and provides information to his fans about the artist’s accomplishments, his books, films, and special projects, plus the most comprehensive Database of H.R. Giger’s artistic output of nearly 40 years.
Our priority now is to support his wife Carmen Maria Scheifele Giger, and the extended Giger family, and ask that you respect our privacy during this time, so we may mourn the loss of our beloved "Hans Ruedi".
Please visit our recently expanded ARTICLES section, an important feature of this supplementary website where we try to maintain a complete and up-to-date archive of all H.R. Giger related newspaper and magazine articles as PDF downloads.
Giger wishes to forewarn all his collectors and fans that most of the merchandise sold on EBay, claiming to have been made by H.R. Giger or to be reproductions of Giger artworks are fakes, forgeries and cheap imitations.
As much as Giger shunned the limelight, preferring his work to speak for him, he was greatly appreciative of every compliment he ever received and we know he would be amazed and humbled by the kindness that continues to be the subject of his eulogies.
An exhibit featuring H.R. Giger’s film design work will be held at the Deutsches Filmmuseum in Frankfurt, Germany from January 21 – July 26, 2009.
As many of you now have heard, "Hans Ruedi" Giger, known to the World as H.R. Giger, passed away yesterday at the age of 74.

He designed several record album covers, including Danzig’s "Danzig 3: How the Gods Kill" and Carcass’s "Heartwork." He also designed Jonathan Davis’s (Korn singer) unique microphone stand.
Mashable’s record 34 million unique visitors worldwide and 15 million social media followers are one of the most influential and engaged online communities.
Best known to the public for designing the Alien creature (or Xenomorph) from the Alien movie franchise, Giger was a painter, sculptor and set designer.
Swiss artist Hans-Ruedi Giger has died at the age of 74, Reuters reports quoting Swedish public broadcaster SRF.
He developed a unique style of art in which he combined mechanical, robotic elements with biological lifeforms, as can be seen in his Necronomicon and Necronomicon II books of paintings.

H.R. Giger, the Swiss surrealist artist who burst into the public consciousness on this side of the Atlantic designing the horrific look of the title creature in "Alien," died Monday after being hospitalized with injuries from a fall, the Associated Press first reported.
H.R. Giger dead at 74: Artist who designed ‘Alien’ nightmarish look leaves legacy beyond movies Swiss artist dead after being injured in fall; surrealist who painted and sculpted around themes of sex and death also designed classic cover for Emerson, Lake & Palmer’s 1973 ‘Brain Salad Surgery’ album.
As word of his controversial art and its themes of sex and death spread beyond Switzerland, Giger was tapped for the album cover of the 1973 Emerson, Lake & Palmer album, "Brain Salad Surgery" — widely considered by critics one of the most memorable album covers of all time.

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