james bond skyfall

It features Daniel Craig’s third performance as James Bond, and Javier Bardem as Raoul Silva, the film’s antagonist.
Skyfall is the twenty-third film in the James Bond series, produced by EON Productions and distributed by MGM and Sony Pictures Entertainment through its Columbia Pictures division.
Silva arrives by helicopter with a second wave and Bond sends M and Kincade off through a tunnel at the back of a priest hole to a chapel on the grounds.
Bond arrives to join Mallory and Eve in fighting off Silva’s attack, and M is hurried from the building by her aide, Bill Tanner.
When Silva arrives, Bond, M and Kincade fight off the first assault, although M is wounded in the process.
The title refers to Skyfall Lodge, Bond’s ancestral home and a key location in the film.
As they arrive at a frozen lake, Bond attacks Silva’s sole remaining follower and the two fall through the ice, where Bond kills him.
Pursued by Bond, Silva adopts the disguise of a policeman and attacks M during a public inquiry into her handling of the stolen hard drive.
Silva kills Sévérine, but Bond overpowers his guards and captures Silva for return to the UK.

Russell, Per Hallberg, Karen Baker Landers Nominated Best Original Music Thomas Newman Won Best Cinematography Roger Deakins Nominated Broadcast Film Critics Association Awards 2012 Best Supporting Actor Javier Bardem Nominated [145] Best Supporting Actress Judi Dench Nominated Best Cinematography Roger Deakins Nominated Best Action Movie Won Best Song "Skyfall" (Adele Adkins, Paul Epworth) Won Best Actor in an Action Movie Daniel Craig Won Best Actress in an Action Movie Judi Dench Nominated Empire Awards 2012 Best Thriller Nominated [146] Best British Film Nominated Best Director Sam Mendes Won Best Actor Daniel Craig Nominated Best Actress Judi Dench Nominated Best Film Won Chicago Film Critics Association 2012 Best Supporting Actress Judi Dench Nominated [147] Best Cinematography Roger Deakins Nominated Best Editing Stuart Baird Nominated Golden Globe Awards 2012 Best Original Song "Skyfall" (Adele Adkins, Paul Epworth) Won [148] Grammy Awards 2014 Best Score Soundtrack for Visual Media Thomas Newman Won [149] Best Song Written for Visual Media "Skyfall" (Adele Adkins, Paul Epworth) Won International Film Music Critics Association Awards 2013 Best Original Score for an Action/Adventure/Thriller Film Thomas Newman Won London Film Critics Circle Awards 2012 Best British or Irish Film of the Year Nominated [150] Actor of the Year in a Supporting Role Javier Bardem Nominated Actress of the Year in a Supporting Role Judi Dench Nominated British Actor of the Year Daniel Craig Nominated British Actress of the Year Judi Dench (shared with her role in The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel) Nominated Los Angeles Film Critics Association Awards 2012 Best Cinematography Roger Deakins Won [151] Producers Guild of America Awards 2012 Outstanding Producer of Theatrical Motion Pictures Barbara Broccoli, Michael G.

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007 Gun Logo and related James Bond Trademarks © 1962 – 2014 Danjaq, LLC and United Artists Corporation.
SKYFALL © 2014 Danjaq, LLC, United Artists Corporation, Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc.

Skyfall, 007 Gun Logo and related James Bond Trademarks © 1962 – 2012 Danjaq, LLC and United Artists Corporation.

Armed with a licence to kill, Secret Agent James Bond sets out on his first mission as 007 and must defeat a weapons dealer in a high stakes game of poker at Casino Royale, but things are not what they seem.
Message Boards Recent Posts Why Bond takes M in the middle of nowhere with no weapons and no backup? TheChosenProfessor Silva’s death was lame TheChosenProfessor Skyfall’s story made no goddamn sense.
James Bond teams up with the lone survivor of a destroyed Russian research center to stop the hijacking of a nuclear space weapon by a fellow agent believed to be dead.
Crazy Credits The opening credits feature Bond periodically shooting at targets, Shanghai dragons, Silva’s skull logo, and the Skyfall mansion from which Bond’s eyes stare out.
James Bond descends into mystery as he tries to stop a mysterious organization from eliminating a country’s most valuable resource.

007 Gun Logo and related James Bond Trademarks © 1962 – 2014 Danjaq, LLC and United Artists Corporation.
SKYFALL © 2014 Danjaq, LLC, United Artists Corporation, Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc.

The film is guided by a considerable director (Sam Mendes), written by the heavyweights Neal Purvis, Robert Wade and John Logan, and delivers not only a terrific Bond but a terrific movie, period.
During the early Bonds, did we ever even ask ourselves about 007’s origins in life? "Skyfall" even produces a moment designed to inspire in Bond fans: a reappearance of the Aston Martin DB5 from "Goldfinger," which remains in good operating condition.
In this 50th year of the James Bond series, with the dismal "Quantum of Solace" (2008) still in our minds, "Skyfall" triumphantly reinvents 007 in one of the best Bonds ever.
Bond and another agent are in Istanbul, chasing a man who has stolen a crucial hard drive, and after a chase through city streets (involving no less than three Fruit Cart Scenes), 007 is running on top of a train.
This is dramatized during Bond’s visit to the weathered Scottish mansion inhabited by Kincade (Albert Finney), which has secrets to divulge and continues the movie’s rewriting of the character’s back story.
It’s the kind of absurd stunt we expect in a Bond movie, but this one relies on something unexpected: a dead-serious M (Judi Dench), following the action from MI6 in London and making a fateful decision.
We know from earlier films that Bond can operate almost anything, but "Skyfall" incredibly has him commandeer of a giant Caterpillar and continue the chase by crushing a flatcar filled with VW Beetles.
Just as Christopher Nolan gave rebirth to the Batman movies in "The Dark Knight," here is James Bond lifted up, dusted off, set back on his feet and ready for another 50 years.

As with all Bond movies, you will need a sense of humour to go with the flow, and the flow does not involve a plot in the boringly normal sense of the word: more the impressionistic effect of scenes and moments and performances – and an entertaining one comes from Ben Whishaw as the gadgetmeister, Q.
As well as revving up the film, this pre-credit sequence, with its cataclysmic finale, showcases a great new Bond theme song from Adele, Basseying those vocals mightily, and conveying the camp combination of Bond’s machismo and strange and preposterous vulnerability.
But what a rush! From the opening in Istanbul to the final siege shootout in the Scottish Highlands, this film is a supremely enjoyable and even sentimental spectacle, giving us an attractively human (though never humane) Bond.
We kickstart the movie with an uproarious chase scene in Istanbul featuring 007 and Bond’s glamorous colleague Eve, played by Naomie Harris.
It finds the right position on the spectrum between extravagance and realism: what I think of as the imaginary line running from Bond’s invisible car in Die Another Day and Peter Guillam’s Citroën DS in Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy.
In recent years, Bond fans have had to tolerate some appalling product placements: fortunately, Bond’s one appearance with a certain type of lager here is with his hand firmly over the logo.
Yet despite the apparently new hi-tech dimension promised by Silva’s evil skills in cyber-terrorism and computer hacking, this is not a futuristic Bond.

Daniel Craig is a great Bond, but what this movie, as it does in all good action films, is the villain Silva played brilliantly by Javier Bardem.
Skyfall delivers everything a Bond movie should: amazing stunts, excitingly lavish action scenes, gorgeous women, martinis, and an awesome opening theme intro/song.
Critics Consensus: Sam Mendes brings Bond surging back with a smart, sexy, riveting action thriller that qualifies as one of the best 007 films to date.
"Skyfall" is a different kind of Bond movie, one that works just fine on its own terms, but a steady diet of this might kill the franchise.
Critics Consensus: Sam Mendes brings Bond surging back with a smart, sexy, riveting action thriller that qualifies as one of the best 007 films to date.
Jardem plays the Bond villain as openly gay (How many Bond villains are gay? "What makes you think that you're my first," says Bond) and with a malevolent joy not seen in awhile ("I KNOW I'm bad, what of it?!"), invigorating the proceedings.
It ought to win a prize just for reconnecting with what made the franchise successful in the first place, while also repositioning the Bond films for the '10s.
It's been a long time since I enjoyed a Bond movie so much.
Movie Info In Skyfall, Bond’s loyalty to M is tested as her past comes back to haunt her.
And the story sets in place not only Craig as the new Bond (finally, as the two films previously failed to do) but also leaves you waiting for the next entry, leaves you waiting even for a remake (Thunderball?).
Skyfall epitomizes what a Bond movie should be, and its director, for once, justifiably deserves much of the credit.

The ending of Skyfall seemed to restore much of the classic elements of a James Bond movie, from the inclusion of Moneypenny and Q (both of whom were left out of Casino Royale and Quantum of Solace), to the design of M’s office echoing that of the older Bond films.
Current franchise star Daniel Craig’s first outing, in 2006′s origin-story/reboot Casino Royale, was a critical and commercial success and for the first time in Bond history was followed by a direct sequel, Quantum of Solace, which was commercially successful but seen as a disappointment by many fans and critics (but not us).
After all even though I’ll admit Quantum of Solace wasn’t a great Bond film, it wasn’t the Quantum part that pulled it down, and I was a little disappointed that Skyfall seemed to drop it.
Directed by Sam Mendes (American Beauty) and written by John Logan (The Aviator) along with franchise veterans Neal Purvis and Robert Wade, Skyfall was a pitch-perfect distillation of the Bond mythos, filled in the Daniel Craig-era back story, and even had possibly the finest cinematography of the entire franchise (courtesy of the legendary Roger Deakins).
Eon Productions recently re-acquired the film rights to the character Ernst Stavro Blofeld, the super-villain who appeared in seven Bond films – From Russia with Love (1963), Thunderball (1965), You Only Live Twice (1967), On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (1969), Diamonds Are Forever (1971), For Your Eyes Only (1981) and Never Say Never Again (1983).
I agree! I’ve seen all of the Eon James Bond movies (and those 1967 Casino Royale and Never Say Never Again movies but ehhh), and Skyfall is actually my favorite of the 23 (which is crazy, because Goldfinger is my #2 now).
According to Logan, the next two entries in the Bond franchise will continue to develop the character and universe based on the events of Skyfall, which Logan instilled with themes and aspects of the classic films.
With Daniel Craig wanting to re-capture some of the franchise’s “old irony” with Bond 24, could this also mean re-visiting the notion of a world-wide criminal organization (which QUANTUM was meant to be)? If so, that would mean someone has to be in charge.
Since I think we can assume they don’t want to make Bond campy again, they’d still need an updated, modern version of SPECTRA and Blofeld – Quantum fits perfectly.

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John Barry incorporated Japanese elements into the title song for YOU ONLY LIVE TWICE, performed by Nancy Sinatra.
FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE theme song – written by Lionel Bart and sung by Matt Munro: known as “the singing bus driver”.
For ON HER MAJESTY’S SECRET SERVICE, John Barry used the new Moog synthesizer to give action sequences a modern edge.
Shirley Bassey returned for DIAMONDS ARE FOREVER, with music by John Barry and lyrics by Don Black.
The title ‘We Have All The Time In The World’ is taken from Bond’s final words in ON HER MAJESTY’S SECRET SERVICE.

The broadcaster, which last year lost its almost 40-year hold on free-to-air rights to the Bond films after BSkyB struck a deal to launch a dedicated channel and air the full back-catalogue, has renewed its longstanding relationship with MGM Worldwide Television.
BSkyB swooped last year to snap up all rights to the catalogue and launch a Sky Movies channel dedicated to airing Bond films, tying in with the launch of Skyfall and the 50th anniversary of the release of the first Bond movie, Dr No.
ITV has struck a deal to bring the James Bond franchise back to free-to-air television, including the latest film, Skyfall, which will air next year.

The franchise has a long history of fake deathery around its lead character – Sean Connery’s Bond met his demise at the beginning of You Only Live Twice and in Skyfall, audiences gasped when 007 was shot off a train in the pre-credits sequence.
Despite his memorable contribution, Bardem was just one little bad (one whose plan for world domination was to rehash the plot of The World Is Not Enough – attack on MI6 headquarters, anyone?) – we want to see Bond face a big bad, a proper organisation of baddies.
I don’t want to see James Bond doing normal stuff – I want to see him somewhere I’ve never been, you know… like Ibiza.
Bond films weren’t created in the early 1960s because some bloke called Fleming had written loads of books (although I’m sure that must have helped when it came to adapting scripts) but as a travel brochure to the world’s cinema-goers.
It meant we got to see Bond at the National Gallery… on the Tube – you know, all the usual crap normal people do when they’re in London.

In the movie SkyFall (2012), James Bond (Daniel Craig) wears a blue N.Peal cashmere sweater under his Barbour jacket in the Scotland scenes.
In the movie SkyFall (2012), James Bond (Daniel Craig) wears a Phonak Invisity Flex Miniature Receiver earpiece in the Macau Casino.
In the movie SkyFall (2012), James Bond (Daniel Craig) wears a Zara Youth shirt with flower pattern.
In the movie SkyFall (2012), James Bond (Daniel Craig) wears Tom Ford mother of pearl cufflinks with his tuxedo.
James Bond (Daniel Craig) wears Tom Ford Striped T cylinder cufflinks in the movie SkyFall (2012).
In the movie SkyFall (2012), James Bond (Daniel Craig) poses as a driver at the Shanghai international airport and follows the villain Patrice (Ola Rapace) in a black Mercedes-Benz S-class.
In the movie SkyFall (2012), James Bond (Daniel Craig) uses a pair of green 3M Peltor H61FA British Army earmuffs at the indoor shooting range.
In the movie SkyFall (2012), James Bond (Daniel Craig) plays in the Floating Dragon Casino in Macau with chips made by Cartamundi.
James Bond (Daniel Craig) wears a pair of Acne Wall Street Shark Grey trousers in SkyFall (2012).
In the 2012 film SkyFall, James Bond (Daniel Craig) wears a black John Smedley Bobby v-neck pullover in Shanghai.

The key anagram is the cryptic message Silva sends to M shortly before all mayhem breaks loose: “THINK ON YOUR SINS.” The language is so highly stylized that I was certain, from the time the words appeared on the screen of M’s laptop, that there was a message hidden within.
Last year, shortly after the excellent James Bond film “Skyfall” was released, I asserted in a column that an anagram at the heart of the film suggested that a critical subplot had been left on the cutting-room floor.
That, then, is my theory of what was left on the cutting-room floor: The anagram was meant to be translated for us and the family connection between Silva and M made explicit.
Immediately after the film’s release, as audiences tried to understand the emotional weight of the final scene, there were whispers in the blogosphere that we were meant to believe that Silva was M’s son.
You will remember that the plot revolves around the destruction wrought by Raoul Silva (Javier Bardem), a former MI6 agent who is angry at M (Judi Dench) for allowing him to be arrested in Hong Kong and then rot in prison rather than arranging an exchange.

The film is guided by a considerable director (Sam Mendes), written by the heavyweights Neal Purvis, Robert Wade and John Logan, and delivers not only a terrific Bond but a terrific movie, period.
During the early Bonds, did we ever even ask ourselves about 007’s origins in life? "Skyfall" even produces a moment designed to inspire love in Bond fans: a reappearance of the Aston Martin DB5 from "Goldfinger," which remains in good operating condition.
In this 50th year of the James Bond series, with the dismal "Quantum of Solace" (2008) still in our minds, "Skyfall" triumphantly reinvents 007 in one of the best Bonds ever.
Bond and another agent are in Istanbul, chasing a man who has stolen a crucial hard drive, and after a chase through city streets (involving no less than three Fruit Cart Scenes), 007 is running on top of a train.
This is dramatized during Bond’s visit to the weathered Scottish mansion inhabited by Kincade (Albert Finney), which has secrets to divulge and continues the movie’s rewriting of the character’s back story.
It’s the kind of absurd stunt we expect in a Bond movie, but this one relies on something unexpected: a dead-serious M (Judi Dench), following the action from MI6 in London and making a fateful decision.
We know from earlier films that Bond can operate almost anything, but "Skyfall" incredibly has him commandeer of a giant Caterpillar and continue the chase by crushing a flatcar filled with VW Beetles.
Just as Christopher Nolan gave rebirth to the Batman movies in "The Dark Knight," here is James Bond lifted up, dusted off, set back on his feet and ready for another 50 years.

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Like every Bond accessory, the pair have to be robust enough to survive the lifestyle – running, jumping, fighting, shooting, occasionally making love – of a top flight secret agent and incorporates a fistful of anti-shock features which ensure Bond will always be at the right place at precisely the right time, no matter how rough the journey is getting there.
Two appear in SKYFALL, a black-dialled OMEGA Planet Ocean 600M and an OMEGA Seamaster Aqua Terra, with its striking blue dial – the first time this coloured face has ever graced that particular model.
The conceptual seam that runs through the latest James Bond movie, SKYFALL, is time.
Time – which as we shall see, is a crucial element to SKYFALL – has left its scars on Bond, both inside and out.
As with any James Bond outing, SKYFALL has to address and acknowledge certain tropes and traditions that are crucial to the most successful entries in the franchise.
As with all the most satisfying appearances of Bond, SKYFALL skilfully skips back and forth between respect for the heritage of the brand and the desire to push it into fresh territory, while subtly acknowledging the game it is playing.
There is also a line, both chilling and laconic, that pithily encapsulates the many perilous situations that Bond has found himself in down the years, an acknowledgement that this isn’t the first time this has happened.
In SKYFALL, as in his previous outings, Daniel Craig brings to Bond not a physical darkness, but a darkness of the soul.

As if to prove Mallory wrong, Bond catches a ride on the bottom of a skyscraper elevator, kills a dude, shaves, dons a tuxedo, hooks up with Bond Girl Severine (Bérénice Marlohe) at a casino, kills some more dudes and finally meets the best Bond villain in decades: hacker extraordinaire Silva.
The nine-time Oscar nominee honors Bond tradition by framing plenty of picture-postcard shots of exotic locales, but Mendes and Deakins raise the ante by grounding the film’s classicism-versus-modernity theme in timeless action vignettes of uncommon lyricism, as when Bond and a mute killer slug it out in silhouette against a deep blue Shanghai skyline.
In Skyfall, cyberterrorist Silva (played by Javier Bardem, right) taunts a captive James Bond (Daniel Craig).
(He won an Oscar for his No Country for Old Men star turn as a coin-flipping psychopath.) Making a grand entrance in a preposterously dyed mane of blond hair, Bardem portrays Silva as a sadistic fop with an indecipherable accent who taunts Bond for being a relic of the old order.
Scripted by John Logan and veteran 007 team Neal Purvis and Robert Wade, Skyfall nudges Bond — the character and the film franchise — into the future by reckoning with the past.
Skyfall kicks off with a brilliant chase sequence that tests the mettle of James Bond (played by Daniel Craig).
Per Bond movie tradition, the PG-13 Skyfall launches with a holy crap! chase scene that cribs from the Jason Bourne motorcycle-chase-in-exotic-city playbook before morphing into a fabulously surreal string of stunts.
In a world where cyberterrorists in pajamas can wreak more havoc with the click of a mouse than a hundred tough guys on the ground, Bond and his steely MI6 handler M (played for the seventh time by Judi Dench) must prove they’re not relics ready to be put out to pasture.
As long as that’s the case, James Bond — puller of triggers, swinger of fists, drinker of martinis and bedder of smokin’ hot spy babes — will remain indispensable to Her Majesty’s Secret Service.
At the end of the outstanding opening, Bond free-falls into the water and lands in a moodily psychedelic title sequence by Daniel Kleinman, set to a lush Adele song, that recalls 007′s cinematic glory days.

I’m always conflicted about buying collector’s sets of movies whose franchises are still in on-going production, but the Bond franchise tied this collection up nicely as a "50 Years of Bond" set instead of labeling it a "complete collection." That gives this set a lot more staying power on my shelf as a collector’s edition that won’t be obsoleted when the next Bond film is released (currently slated for November 2015, with Skyfall’s director Sam Mendes returning to work with Daniel Craig, who is signed on for at least two more Bond films).

In You Only Live Twice Fleming reveals that, as a boy, 007 attended Fettes College – a private school in Edinburgh – whilst the iconic setting for Bond’s family estate in Skyfall comes directly from On Her Majesty’s Secret Service – the film in which Bond reveals that his father is originally from Glencoe.
There’s just a fleeting glimpse of Scotland this time, although it’s a key moment in 1977’s The Spy Who Loved Me. It is where Commander Bond (in one of the few occasions he is seen wearing full navy uniform) discovers that the loss of British submarines is no accident, but a sinister plot by the evil Stromberg (Curd Jurgens).
Craig is the fourth Bond to film in Scotland, and while he was seen jetting off to the Bahamas and South America in his first two outings, the character goes back to his Scottish roots in Skyfall.
Eilean Donan Castle had an unforgettable cameo in The World is Not Enough (1999), when it served as the Scottish headquarters of MI6. The film’s producers fully embraced the Scottish connection, with Q (Desmond Llewelyn) giving Bond (Pierce Brosnan) a demonstration of bagpipes that double as a machine gun.
Aside from beautiful women and ingenious gadgets, stunning locations are a key ingredient of James Bond films and Skyfall is surprisingly the fourth film to feature Scotland.
In 1963, From Russia With Love saw Bond (Sean Connery) and beautiful Russian agent Tatiana Romanova (Daniela Bianchi) being pursued by sinister SPECTRE agents in a speed boat in Turkey.

Skyfall: ‘most successful’ James Bond film tops $1bn at global box office Skyfall, the latest James Bond film, smashed through the $1 billion mark at the box office tonight as it continued its record-breaking showing in cinemas worldwide.
Before Skyfall, which is said to have been made for a reported $200 million, Avatar was previously the highest grossing film in Britain, taking more than £94 million at the UK box office during its cinematic release.
Despite falling out of the week’s top 10 films in the US, the James Bond film is only the third movie to cross $1 billion in worldwide ticket sales this year, after The Avengers ($1.51 billion) and The Dark Knight Rises ($1.08 billion).
The film’s success comes as Hollywood had a record year in 2012, making $10.8 billion (£6.6 billion) at the box office in North America alone, as the number of tickets sold rose for the first time in three years.
Tonight, the film’s executives announced it had now earned at least $1bn (£620 million) at the global box office, with $710.6 million (£440 million) being made outside of North America.
The Sam Mendes-directed film, released 50 years after the franchise’s first movie Dr No in 1962, has now become the highest earning out of all of the 23 James Bond instalments.
Jeff Blake, a vice chairman of Sony Pictures, which also produced and distributed the film, said Skyfall was now "the most successful James Bond film of all time".
Over the weekend, the film took a further $1.4 million (£867,000) in Britain, bringing its total earnings to $161.6 million, making it the first film to break the £100 million barrier in the UK.

Learn more about two dozen notable fall releases–a group that includes potential Oscar contenders, a new Bond film, a promising time-travel story, and more–and get a full release calendar for movies arriving between now and mid-November.
The holiday movie season kicks off this weekend with what could be the best James Bond film yet, but there are plenty more treats in store over the coming weeks, including new films from Quentin Tarantino, Kathryn Bigelow, Michael Haneke, David O.
The product placement in this film is the most blatant I’ve ever seen at one point, an agent of Mi6, in the middle of a tense scene tracking down Bardem, finds the time to take a swig from a bottle of heineken! Craig looks too thin in the film, and not at all as convincing as in casino royale.
It all starts off promisingly, with a cool chase scene, and the great opening titles, but the story is so unbelievably silly, so far from the gritty reality we found in casino royale that the film quickly reveals itself as a huge dissapointment.
Daniel Craig is the best Bond in my opinion, because he has updated the Bond franchise into movies with density, drama and critics, not just act like it was before.
The stars and the explosions are backed up by plenty of class – Ralph Fiennes as M’s new boss, Naomie Harris and Berenice Marlohe as a couple of the requisite Bond beauties, and Judi Dench finally given the space to turn M into a full-bodied character.
Since Daniel Craig took the post of Bond, the agent is turning into a complex character, with psychological density.

No or Goldfinger or whatever, and there’s been so many ways to do a cat-and-mouse and intimidate Bond, and we thought, what would truly make the audience uncomfortable is sexual intimidation; playing the sort of homoerotic card that is sort of always there subtextually with characters like Scaramanga in ‘Man With the Golden Gun’ or ‘Dr.
After regaling a captive James Bond (Daniel Craig) with a story about cannibal rats (true), Bardem’s Silva begins lasciviously flirting with 007.
"I don’t see the world in sexual divisions." Craig then added that while some have suggested Bardem’s Silva might be homosexual, he didn’t agree.
Javier Bardem’s "Skyfall" villain doesn’t appear until almost an hour into the film, but he’s given quite an entrance.
When asked about the moment last month, star Craig shot down any thought to Bond being bisexual.

Cinema historians haven’t yet crowned a most famous unseen DVD extra in history, and so we humbly submit for future consideration: the blooper reel for Skyfall, the 23rd official film in the James Bond series and the third starring Daniel Craig as 007.
In 2006’s Casino Royale and its direct sequel, Quantum of Solace, Bond “fell in love, his love of his life was killed, and then he goes off on revenge; it’s a really dark story,” Craig pointed out.
Though the franchise has always (literally) dined out on product placement—Bollinger champagne, say—Skyfall’s deal with Heineken, which required Craig as Bond to quaff one and appear as well in a series of ads, provoked another round of Internet commentary, with die-hard fans worried that Bond was being coarsened by commercial imperatives.
Longtime Bond co-producer Barbara Broccoli, daughter of the original Bond co-producer Albert “Cubby” Broccoli, had first seen him on the British mini-series Our Friends in the North, on which Craig played a prison escapee/lapsed musician with the impossible name of Geordie Peacock.
He’s someone who’s very professional, and he throws himself into whatever he’s doing, and he understood it’d be a long commitment, over at least a decade.” Indeed, Craig recently signed on for two more Bond films, which will likely keep him in harness as 007 through 2016, at the earliest.
As he makes his third appearance as 007, in the 23rd James Bond film, Daniel Craig is coming to terms with the extraordinary pressures of portraying a half-century-old icon.
Craig says he didn’t have much input into the Olympics sketch—“Danny Boyle just asked me to do it; I just did what I was told”—but back when he signed on as an initially reluctant Bond, he got in the habit of contributing ideas about the scripts, marketing, and character development for the films.
In a five-minute sketch, Craig, as 007, enlisted no less a Bond girl than the 86-year-old Queen of England for a mission whose aims were foggy but whose means included collecting Elizabeth II at Buckingham Palace in a helicopter and parachuting alongside her into Olympic Stadium.
When a teaser photo for Skyfall was released at the beginning of 2012, it showed Craig, as Bond, sitting poolside without a shirt and facing away from the camera.
You want to be in film? Get a job.” Despite his somewhat dour reputation, Craig finished this statement with a rapturously conspiratorial giggle—the kind of laugh two friends might emit upon sharing a bitchy secret about a mutual friend who just walked into the room.

Cinema historians haven’t yet crowned a most famous unseen DVD extra in history, and so we humbly submit for future consideration: the blooper reel for Skyfall, the 23rd official film in the James Bond series and the third starring Daniel Craig as 007.
In 2006’s Casino Royale and its direct sequel, Quantum of Solace, Bond “fell in love, his love of his life was killed, and then he goes off on revenge; it’s a really dark story,” Craig pointed out.
Though the franchise has always (literally) dined out on product placement—Bollinger champagne, say—Skyfall’s deal with Heineken, which required Craig as Bond to quaff one and appear as well in a series of ads, provoked another round of Internet commentary, with die-hard fans worried that Bond was being coarsened by commercial imperatives.
Longtime Bond co-producer Barbara Broccoli, daughter of the original Bond co-producer Albert “Cubby” Broccoli, had first seen him on the British mini-series Our Friends in the North, on which Craig played a prison escapee/lapsed musician with the impossible name of Geordie Peacock.
He’s someone who’s very professional, and he throws himself into whatever he’s doing, and he understood it’d be a long commitment, over at least a decade.” Indeed, Craig recently signed on for two more Bond films, which will likely keep him in harness as 007 through 2016, at the earliest.
As he makes his third appearance as 007, in the 23rd James Bond film, Daniel Craig is coming to terms with the extraordinary pressures of portraying a half-century-old icon.
Craig says he didn’t have much input into the Olympics sketch—“Danny Boyle just asked me to do it; I just did what I was told”—but back when he signed on as an initially reluctant Bond, he got in the habit of contributing ideas about the scripts, marketing, and character development for the films.
In a five-minute sketch, Craig, as 007, enlisted no less a Bond girl than the 86-year-old Queen of England for a mission whose aims were foggy but whose means included collecting Elizabeth II at Buckingham Palace in a helicopter and parachuting alongside her into Olympic Stadium.
When a teaser photo for Skyfall was released at the beginning of 2012, it showed Craig, as Bond, sitting poolside without a shirt and facing away from the camera.
You want to be in film? Get a job.” Despite his somewhat dour reputation, Craig finished this statement with a rapturously conspiratorial giggle—the kind of laugh two friends might emit upon sharing a bitchy secret about a mutual friend who just walked into the room.

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