karl wallenda

On July 18, 1970, a 65-year-old Wallenda performed a high-wire walk, also known as a skywalk, across the Tallulah Gorge, a gorge formed by the Tallulah River in Georgia.
In 1978, at age 73, Wallenda attempted a walk between the two towers of the ten-story Condado Plaza Hotel in San Juan, Puerto Rico, on a wire stretched 121 ft (37 metres) above the pavement.
Nik Wallenda, a direct descendant of Karl Wallenda, continues the family tradition of performing stunts on highwire without a safety net.

wire thrills, skywalks, entertainment and the individuals involved who built these traditions.
the original troupe, The Great Wallendas, and continued after the death of their grandfather.
traditions that  made the Wallenda name what it is today.
Rick Wallenda, Rietta Wallenda, Mario Wallenda, and Valerie Wallenda.

Karl precariously balanced on a chair on top of a bar between the shoulders of the two men who were on bicycles on a wire 50 feet in the air while Helen would stand on Karl’s shoulders! This act was such a sensation that when John Ringling saw them performing in Cuba, he immediately contracted them to appear with the "Greatest Show On Earth." When the Great Wallendas debuted their act (without a net – it had been misplaced in shipping) at Madison Square Garden in 1928, they received a standing ovation that lasted 15 minutes! Never before or to date has applause stopped a performance for that length of time.
All have performed together in the past and were involved in the 7-Person Pyramid at various stages in recent years.In 1998, the current era of the Wallendas reunited the performing family members to recreate their crowning achievement, the 7-person pyramid, reestablishing their legacy in circus history.

In 1978, at age 73, Wallenda attempted a walk between the two towers of the ten-story Condado Plaza Hotel in San Juan, Puerto Rico, on a wire stretched 37 metres (121 ft) above the pavement, but fell to his death when winds exceeded 48 kilometres per hour (30 miles per hour).
The Great Wallendas, a 1978 made-for-TV movie starring Lloyd Bridges as Karl Wallenda, depicts the act's comeback after a fatal accident involving several family members during a performance.

In 1978, at age 73, Wallenda attempted a walk between the two towers of the ten-story Condado Plaza Hotel in San Juan, Puerto Rico, on a wire stretched 37 metres (121 ft) above the pavement, but fell to his death when winds exceeded 48 kilometres per hour (30 miles per hour).
The Great Wallendas, a 1978 made-for-TV movie starring Lloyd Bridges as Karl Wallenda, depicts the act's comeback after a fatal accident involving several family members during a performance.

Wallenda, 32, who calls himself "the king of the high-wire," has broken several world records and holds the Guinness Record for crossing the longest and highest high-wire on a bicycle, but Saturday’s walk was the biggest of his career, he said.
That defiance, however, became even more breathtaking Saturday when Wallenda completed the exact 100-foot-high walk that killed his great-grandfather, Karl Wallenda, who fell to his death in 1978 at age 73.

This entry was posted in Workplace Accident and tagged Daredevil, Fall to Death, Karl Wallenda, Karl Wallenda Death, Karl Wallenda Death Video, Karl Wallenda High Wire Death, Stunt Gone Bad, Stuntman Dies, Workplace Accident by Vincit Omnia Veritas.

(CBS/AP) NIAGARA FALLS, N.Y. – Nik Wallenda will live out a childhood dream as he attempts to become the first ever person to cross directly over the Niagra Falls by tightrope.
Wallenda has said he is disappointed he is being made to wear a tether by the event’s sponsor, ABC, since his family has performed over the years without such safety precautions.
U.S. Customs and Border Protection said the Rainbow Bridge is also likely to see a large increase in pedestrian and vehicular traffic, especially after the walk Friday night.
Wallenda, 33, said that this has been a dream of his since he was 6 years old on a visit to the Falls with his parents.

Other tragedies include when Wallenda’s sister-in-law, Rietta, fell to her death in 1963, and his son-in-law Richard ("Chico") Guzman was killed in 1972 after touching a live electric wire while holding part of the metal rigging.
Nik Wallenda became the first aerialist to walk directly over the Little Colorado River Gorge in the Grand Canyon in the U.S. State of Arizona on June 23, 2013, doing so as it was broadcast live on Discovery Channel.
Karl Wallenda was born in Magdeburg, Germany, in 1905 to an old circus family, and began performing at the age of 6.
On March 22, 1978, during a promotional walk in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Karl Wallenda fell from the wire and died.
There are several branches of the Wallendas performing today, comprising mostly grandchildren of Karl Wallenda.
They continued performing those acts until 1962, when, while performing at the Shrine Circus at Detroit’s State Fair Coliseum, the front man on the wire faltered and the pyramid collapsed.
The Flying Wallendas is the name of a circus act and daredevil stunt performers, most known for performing highwire acts without a safety net.
Karl Wallenda crossed the Tallulah Gorge in Georgia on a high wire on July 18, 1970.

On March 22, 1978, at age 73, Karl Wallenda attempted a walk between the two towers of the 10-story Condado Plaza Hotel in San Juan, Puerto Rico, on a wire stretched 37 metres (121 feet) above the pavement, but fell to his death when winds exceeded 48 kilometres per hour (30 miles per hour).

Warning – Item Tight Rope Walking Fatality RIP Karl Wallenda might contain content that is not suitable for all ages.

#6 ) How about a line connected to the grappling hook and concealed within the pole that pays out slowly when it catches on the wire.
T    he falling death of Karl Wallenda gave me many ideas about how to "walk the wire" more safely.
Wire walking in a hurricane? On the other hand, such verticality would interfere with guy wires holding the walking wire steady.

He is known for his work on The Great Wallendas (1978), Ring of Fear (1954) and The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson (1962).
Trivia: In 1978 while in Puerto Rico, he was crossing a beam between two skyscrapers when he fell to his death.

By 1947, Karl Wallenda had raised the stakes: he expanded his high-wire pyramid from four people to seven, with four men on a wire making up the pyramid’s base level, two men in the middle and a woman standing on a chair at the top.
The older generations of Wallendas continue to walk the wire, too, including Nik Wallenda’s mother, Delilah Wallenda Troffer, now 59, his uncle Tino Wallenda, 61, and Jenny Wallenda, 84, Karl Wallenda’s daughter.
High-wire acrobats Delilah Wallenda, right, lowers her head as her son Nik Wallenda, left, crosses over her during their high-wire act where the two simultaneously walked across a 300-foot-long wire suspended 100 feet in the air between two towers of the Conrad Condado Plaza Hotel in San Juan, Puerto Rico, June 4, 2011.
Last year, Nik and Delilah Wallenda Troffer did the same walk in honor of Karl Wallenda for the Science Channel’s show, "Danger by Design," on the Science Channel premiering on June 18.
Karl Wallenda and his team began performing a jaw-dropping four-person, high-wire pyramid: two men sitting on bicycles on a tightrope held a bar upon which Karl Wallenda balanced on a chair while Helen stood on his shoulders.
In July 1970, Karl Wallenda performed one of his most memorable stunts, walking a tightrope 750 feet up in the air above Georgia’s Tallulah Falls Gorge.
The Wallenda family says he fell after a rig had not been properly stabilized and, as an older man, it was an obstacle Karl Wallenda just couldn’t overcome.
Nik Wallenda’s mother and Karl Wallenda’s grandaughter, Delilah Wallenda Troffer, remembers her grandfather’s resilience.
Karl Wallenda performed in his family’s shows at age six, eventually specializing in doing handstands upon stacked chairs.
Nik Wallenda’s mother and father, Delilah Wallenda Troffer and Terry Troffer, toured the world with Karl Wallenda.
Karl Wallenda died at age 73 in Puerto Rico during a high-wire walk between two hotels on a windy day in 1978.
One of his recruits, a teenage girl named Helen Kreis, later became Karl Wallenda’s wife.
Two family members plunged to their deaths and Karl Wallenda’s son, Mario, was paralyzed.
Karl Wallenda walks a tightrope from two corners of the Tower Hotel with Tower Bridge in the background, Nov.
Building human pyramids upon high wires became Wallenda patriarch Karl Wallenda’s signature act.
Clockwise from the top left are Karl Wallenda, Helen Wallenda, Joe Geiger and Herman Wallenda.
A poster advertising Karl Wallenda’s circus troupe.
Karl Wallenda was also injured and hospitalized, but he didn’t stay in a hospital bed for long.

and Barnum & Baily Circus the story of Karl Wallenda is a tale of unremitting courage, gargantuan strength and simple price in doing the one thing only he could do.
and Barnum & Baily Circus the story of Karl Wallenda is a tale of unremitting courage, gargantuan strength and simple price in doing the one thing only he could do.
From the childhood days of poverty and performances in the ‘Biergartens’ of World War One Germany to earn enough money to feed his family to the days of triumph and tragedy as the headline act for Ringling Bros.
From the childhood days of poverty and performances in the ‘Biergartens’ of World War One Germany to earn enough money to feed his family to the days of triumph and tragedy as the headline act for Ringling Bros.
Readers will be thrilled to read of the conquest of fear in the creation of heretofore impossible feats and saddened with the inevitable deaths when so much relies on pure courage and will.
Readers will be thrilled to read of the conquest of fear in the creation of heretofore impossible feats and saddened with the inevitable deaths when so much relies on pure courage and will.

Made-for-TV movie, tells the true story of the Great Wallendas, a family of circus acrobats famous for their seven-person high wire pyramid act, that one night ended in tragedy.
Made-for-TV movie, tells the true story of the Great Wallendas, a family of circus acrobats famous for their seven-person high wire pyramid act, that one night ended in tragedy.
Hi, everybody ! It was incredible find this special site about movies, because I used to watch The Great Wallendas with Lloyd Bridges as Karl and the marvelous other actors and actresses on TV here in Brazil every time they presented it.

<p>Part of the draw of the Wallenda family’s celebrated history of “death defying” acts is the cold hard fact that sometimes, death is not actually defied.</p><p>From the 1936 demise of Willie Wallenda in a fall in Europe, to the crash of family patriarch Karl Wallenda onto Puerto Rican pavement in 1978, the family’s history is noted for its tragedies almost as much as for its triumphs.</p><p>Nik Wallenda hopes to secure his own legacy in the family — one of success, and survival — on Friday night when he attempts to cross Niagara Falls on a 1,450-foot-long high wire.</p><p>But history has taught him that even if he makes it through alive, if perfection is not attained the results can be disastrous.</p><p>Few have a greater appreciation of that risk than Mario Wallenda.</p><p>The 72-year-old adopted son of circus legend Karl Wallenda doesn’t remember the accident that put him in a wheelchair for life.
Jenny’s 76-year-old sister, Carla, is on tour with her swaypole.</p><p>Imbued with mischievous humor and a tendency to dish — “You don’t have to write that down!” she says in her German accent — Jenny Wallenda admits to famously calling her father a murderer after the Detroit disaster.</p><p>Jenny claimed her second husband, Faughnan, died needlessly because Karl knew Dieter Schepp was the weakest link in the pyramid and inserted him into the lineup anyway.
Never again, vowed Karl, would his family be lulled into false complacency by a net or anything else.</p><p>But no doubt the Wallendas’ subsequent string of successes would inure audiences to the dangers of their trade; so tight were their performances that even the accidents looked staged.</p><p>During the 1940s, four troupe members toppled from a wire in Akron, Ohio, but were unhurt, moving a bedazzled reporter to write, “The Wallendas fell so gracefully that it seemed as if they were flying.”</p><p>At times, the wire could actually seem safer than the ground itself.
“I thought, why should I go to the show when all it does is make me feel bad?” he wondered.</p><p>But his own limitations failed to suppress the impulse to test the wire again.</p><p>With the assistance of friends, family and a custom-built, battery-powered “skycycle,” Mario Wallenda skymotored between two cranes in Sarasota, in 2001 and 2004.
A year later, Karl’s 42-year-old sister-in-law, Rietta Grotofent, plunged 50 feet to her death in Omaha, Neb., when she attempted a headstand on a fiberglass swaypole.</p><p>In a 1972 accident no one had had prepared for, perched high above a crowd in Wheeling, W.Va., Karl’s son-in-law, Chico Guzman, was shocked into a fatal fall when the balance pole he was to pass to Karl struck a live wire.</p><p>Despite his own peerless triumphs, from Tallulah Gorge to the Houston Astrodome to a world skywalk distance record of 1,800 feet at King’s Island, Karl Wallenda himself would be defined by his horrific final act for the YouTube generation.

Now, as the facility’s history nears a close, Kiteman’s falls, the Phanatic’s antics and Wallenda’s breath-sapping walks – he made a second in 1976 – figure to be recalled as readily as the stadium’s bad turf and great ball .
Two weeks after his son-in-law had died in one high-wire mishap and a decade after the deaths of several family members in another, the 67-year-old Wallenda had just completed a 640-foot walk on a dangerously swaying, 3/8-inch steel cable, 168 feet above Veterans Stadium’s rock-hard surface.
This coming Friday, August 13, the Phillies will honor the 40th anniversary of Karl Wallenda’s tightrope walk across Veterans Stadium.
To portray the Phillie Phanatic in its April 25, 1978, debut, Giles selected a wisecracking Phillies office worker, 23-year-old Dave Raymond.
The day the Great Wallenda walked across Veterans Stadium on a tightrope and other Phillies feats.
"He called it the most difficult walk he ever made," said Bill Giles, the Phillies’ chairman who was then their promotions director.

"The Braves games were the perfect setting for anything we wanted to do.  We paid the legendary wire-walker Karl Wallenda $3,000 to walk his wire across the top of the stadium between games of a doubleheader.  The stunt was the most amazing I could imagine.  Basically, the Great Wallenda, as he was called by those who follow wire-walking, drove into town with all his equipment in the back of a truck.  He, his niece, and a couple of other family members strung the wire (actually a cable) across the very top of the stadium, spanning over first and third base from the stadium light towers, more than three hundred feet across.  Wallenda was in his seventies (the article below says 67 – ATM) but he worked the entire day prior to the walk putting up the contraption.
In fact, the night before his performance Wallenda was so tired that he fell asleep during the game on a sofa in the press lounge adjacent to the press box.  Dozing off is likely what any seventy-year-old man who had just been through a day of hard labor might do.  But he had taken a few drinks, and rumor swept through the press box that he passed out drunk.  The old man, so they thought, was in a stupor, and the next day I was paying him to walk a long thin wire a hundred feet above the ground in a stadium full of people, many of them kids (the article below says 600 feet above the ground – ATM).  Everyone assured me he would fall and kill himself in front of all those people.  And, of course, it would be my fault.
The whole scenario of the Wallenda walk was deadly.  At the end of the first game of the doubleheader, every able-bodied ground-crew member and stadium usher was on the field.  They faced each other in two lines parallel to Wallenda’s cable, and each one was given the end of one of the many ropes attached to the cable.  Each man wrapped his rope-end around his waist twice and knotted it in front, then leaned backward to provide enough tension to keep the cable steady.  No one could slip, they were told, or the Great Wallenda would fall.
As today is the day that Karl Wallenda’s great-grandson Nik will stroll across a gorge near the Grand Canyon on a cable, safely we hope, it’s the perfect time to recall that Karl walked across the top of Atlanta Stadium in 1972 between the games of a doubleheader.  Atlanta Braves’ promotions director Bob Hope wrote a superb book in the early 90s recalling the zany stunts the Braves employed with great regularity in the 1970s in an attempt to fill seats at the ballpark.  The following is an excerpt from his book We Could Have Finished Last Without You.
Wallenda, looking every bit his age, stepped onto the cable.  The crowd gasped as he walked slowly, holding onto a long balance pole, crossing the stadium a step at a time.  Every few steps he would stop and look like he might be stumbling or losing his balance.  He would yell instructions down to the ground.  But by the mid-point of his walk, I could tell this guy knew what he was doing.  On closer look, the uncertain steps looked more act than accident.  And in twelve minutes flat, he was all the way across, safe on the other side.
Perplexed, I decided to climb into the lights of the stadium and try to comprehend what Wallenda had in front of him the next day.  I wanted to take a close look at the wire Wallenda would have between him and the ground.  I’ll always remember the moment I stood at the edge of the wire and looked down on the field and crowd below.  I tried to imagine what it would take to make him take that first step out onto the wire.  The ball game was going on below, and the players looked like little bugs moving around.  The crowd was a mass of blurry spots.  It was terrifying.  No way this could be done.

[kahrl;; German kahrl] /kɑrl;; German kɑrl/ (Show IPA), 1905–78, German circus aerialist.

A tight-rope walker who died in 1978 in San Juan after falling from a 37 meter high wire.

Karl Wallenda, 67, the famous high-wire performer who is known as the ‘Great Wallenda’, begins to take his walk across Philadelphia’s Veteran Stadium during a break between the Phillies-Montreal Expo’s double header on Aug.
Karl Wallenda, 67, the famous high-wire performer who is known as the ‘Great Wallenda’, begins to take his walk across Philadelphia’s Veteran Stadium during a break between the Phillies-Montreal Expo’s double header on Aug.
Karl Wallenda, 67, the famous high-wire performer who is known as the ‘Great Wallenda’, begins to take his walk across Philadelphia’s Veteran Stadium during a break between the Phillies-Montreal Expo’s double header on Aug.

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Daredevil tightrope walker Nik Wallenda plans to make his way across the nearly 1,000-foot deep Tallulah Gorge in the northeast Georgia mountains in the footsteps of his famous relative.
Nik Wallenda, 35, says he’s already visited the gorge near the Georgia town of Tallulah Falls, and he’s considering attempting the feat within the next three years.
In northeast Georgia, local leaders say a high-wire walk across the Tallulah Gorge has the potential of drawing thousands of tourists to the area and increasing its visibility globally.
Karl Wallenda’s walk across the gorge drew an estimated 30,000 spectators to the north Georgia mountains.
‘To be able to walk literally in his footsteps is what my life’s about,’ said Nik Wallenda, who discussed the idea in an interview hours after he crossed a 100-foot-high tightrope inside the Georgia Dome in Atlanta February 8.
The Georgia gorge holds special meaning for Wallenda, since his great-grandfather Karl Wallenda crossed it on a high wire on July 18, 1970.
Last year, Mr Wallenda, who is married to a fellow aerialist and has three children, crossed the Little Colorado River Gorge in the Grand Canyon area of Arizona.
Karl Wallenda’s life came to a tragic end at age 72 when he plunged to his death while trying to walk a cable in 30mph winds between two 10-story buildings in San Juan, Puerto Rico in 1978.
The Georgia gorge walk would add to accomplishments that include his televised crossing of Niagara Falls in June 2012 that gained international attention.

The family’s American circus history began in 1928 when Karl Wallenda and his troupe of high wire artist arrived in the United States to perform with the Ringling Brothers and Barnum and Bailey Circus.
                                Karl Wallenda above Veterans Stadium, Philadelphia, Pa.
      June 4, 2011   San Juan, Puerto Rico, Nik completes Karl’s ill fated walk, 121 Ft.
In his youth Nik was not sure if he wanted to continue the family’s circus tradition, however in at age 19, after performing in the seven person "Wallenda Pyramid", Nik new that the high wire was in in his blood.
Nik Wallenda is the great-grandson of famed high wire artist Karl Wallenda and the seventh generation of the family of circus performers.
A Few of Nik Wallenda’s Sky-Walks       August 15, 2009   Kings Island, Ohio, 800 Ft.
                                          Photo Credit: Detroit News Jana Schepp drops to net   Photo Credit: Detroit News Wallendas perform the day after the fall.
          Photo Credit: Sports Illustrated Re-creation of the 7 person pyramid Detroit, MI.
In 1972 ,Richard "Chico" Guzman (1943 – 1972), husband of Karl’s daughter Carla, was electrocuted when a balancing pole he was holding, touch a live wire during a performance, July 28 1972 at Wheeling Island Stadium, Wheeling, West Virginia.

High wire walker Nik Wallenda has a date in mind for crossing a nearly 1,000-foot-deep gorge in the northeast Georgia mountains, 45 years after his great-grandfather accomplished the feat.He intends to walk across Tallulah Gorge on or very near July 18, 2015, his agent, Winston Simone, said Friday.That will be the 45th anniversary of the day Karl Wallenda successfully crossed it as an estimated 30,000 spectators watched.

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