merry christmas in hawaiian

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had a cool t-shirt for sale – a Hawaiian-style Christmas tree, with “Mele Kalikimaka” below it, and “Hau’oli Makahiki Hou” on the side (Hawaiian for happy new year).
The easiest way to learn how to say Mele Kalikimaka is to listen to Bing Crosby sing this classic song from his White Christmas album.
I’m happy to say that their is a Hawaii Christmas song out that is Country .
See the below video of Hawaii scenes set to the famous song, Mele Kalikimaka.

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"Mele Kalikimaka" is track #12 on the album White Christmas.
"Mele Kalikimaka" is track #12 on the album White Christmas.
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DW regarding the prolonged isolation of the Hawaiian people: On the other hand, Captain Cook’s crews, who had just spent considerable time in Polynesian parts farther south, immediately recognized the language of the Hawaiians as Polynesian and not much different from that which they had encountered elsewhere.
That, of course, is because Hawaiian doesn’t allow consonant clusters — so that /krɪ/ becomes /kali/ – or syllable-final consonants — so that /mas/ becomes /maka/.
That, of course, is because Hawaiian doesn’t allow consonant clusters — so that /krɪ/ becomes /kali/ – or syllable-final consonants — so that /mas/ becomes /maka/.
That, of course, is because Hawaiian doesn’t allow consonant clusters — so that /krɪ/ becomes /kali/ – or syllable-final consonants — so that /mas/ becomes /maka/.
There are other tricks language plays to be heard but I can only think of the two complexes of languages half a world apart that show evidence of pervasive adaptation to ambient sound.
The Hawaiian version of "Merry Christmas," Mele Kalikimaka, did not surface until 1904, when it was printed by Ka Nupepa Kuokoa.
And while we’re on renderings of Christmas in the Oceanic subgroup of the Austronesian language family, there’s the island name Kiritimati — which, despite the spelling, has a pronunciation in Gilbertese/Kiribati not too far off from the English word from which it’s derived.
On the other end, the languages of the Kalahari and nearby areas seem designed to sound like natural noises with clicks and hisses that might be insects or the wind but can carry information to humans and not their wary prey.
J Lee regarding westward: Didn’t the Polynesian languages move roughly eastward? Regarding the weird free variation between [t] and [k]: in Hawaiian songs I think I’ve sometimes heard an [s] substituted for emphasis.
When is a foreign sound so alien to a language that it’s "disallowed"? When does a linguist–or just a transcriptionist–decide to throw her hands up and say: "these people will never get this"? I’m sure Victor Mair can offer some clarification here.
When they say "Merry Christmas" in other languages, they usually just use the word for "Happy" like "Feliz Navidad".
Victor Mair: I’m spending Christmas in Australia, where very few of the indigenous languages have any fricatives at all (think of the sound of stereotype Australian place names like Wollongong and Wagga Wagga and Kirribilli).
"Mele" for "merry", OK — obviously /l/ is the closest thing to /r/ in Hawaiian, we’re used to that from stereotypes (and even facts) about Japanese and other varieties of "Engrish".

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The Hawaiian language contains only 13 letters, – five vowels, seven consonants and the ‘okina, which is called a ‘glottal stop’ in English.
English speakers learning Hawaiian should remember Hawaiian grammar word order.

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Like the fresh water from the mountain spring that travels downstream bringing life to the loʻi (taro fields), Waipunaʻs music will rejuvenate your senses and encourage personal growth by providing a melodic serving of music for the mind.
Kale and Matt invite audiences and fans to return with the release of E Hoʻi Mai, a collection of songs that pay tribute to where they have come from, recognize the people that have helped to guide them, and provide a glimpse as to where their music will lead them.
Their eclectic musical backgrounds and similar taste in music has led to the development of a unique sound that draws comparisons to their name, Waipuna, or spring water.
After the release of their critically acclaimed first album, Manaʻo Pili, in November of 2009, the duo has been blessed with the opportunity to share their music with Hawaiʻi, the continental US and Japan.

Willie K.

While preparing for Christmas parties, going to shopping malls and checking our naughty and nice lists may we not forget that this holiday is about more than parties, giving or even Santa Clause.
It’s not a secret to anyone who knows me that the Christmas Season is my very favorite time of year.
As is my tradition each Christmas, I share my simple "Christmas Poem" along with special links to my favorite "Hawaiian Christmas Music".
I have found at times during this season that it’s really quite easy to lose sight of the true meaning and value of Christmas.

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Posted by Clifford DeCosta on December 01, 2013 in Blog.
Mele Kalikimaka is Merry Christmas in Hawaiian.

Since it was the American missionaries who developed the written form of Hawaiian so that they could teach Hawaiians to read and write in their own language, you can imagine it was also them who brought Christmas – and with it the phrase “Merry Christmas!” – to Hawaii.
So, enjoy your “Kalikimaka” in Hawaii this year! And make sure you practice saying “Mele Kalikimaka” to as many locals as possible! You are sure to get a hearty “Mele Kalikimaka” in return, delivered with our trademark Hawaiian spirit of aloha.

Happy Monday! Hope you enjoyed a fabulous holiday weekend with friends and family! Just a short post today with a few pictures from our Christmas here on the island.

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A Hawaiian Christmas with slack key master Kapono Beamer will fill your heart and soul with the Aloha spirit on Christmas Day.  He shares memories of what it was like growing up in the Beamer family, one of Hawaii’s most respected musical families, and how they celebrated the holidays.  On his CD, "Great Grandmother, Great Grandson," Kapono plays music inspired by his great grandmother, Helen Desha Beamer.  She was a prominent Hawaiian songwriter in the first half of the 20th century, who was known for her exquisite melodies.
A Hawaiian Christmas with slack key master Kapono Beamer will fill your heart and soul with the Aloha spirit on Christmas Day.  He shares memories of what it was like growing up in the Beamer family, one of Hawaii’s most respected musical families, and how they celebrated the holidays.  On his CD, "Great Grandmother, Great Grandson," Kapono plays music inspired by his great grandmother, Helen Desha Beamer.  She was a prominent Hawaiian songwriter in the first half of the 20th century, who was known for her exquisite melodies.
A Hawaiian Christmas with slack key master Kapono Beamer will fill your heart and soul with the Aloha spirit on Christmas Day.  He shares memories of what it was like growing up in the Beamer family, one of Hawaii’s most respected musical families, and how they celebrated the holidays.  On his CD, "Great Grandmother, Great Grandson," Kapono plays music inspired by his great grandmother, Helen Desha Beamer.  She was a prominent Hawaiian songwriter in the first half of the 20th century, who was known for her exquisite melodies.
During this half-hour long music special hosted by Heidi Chang, Kapono also performs live, singing "Silent Night" in Hawaiian.  Hawaiian culture is based on the oral tradition.  So Kapono is passing on his family’s rich cultural heritage, through his stories and music.  His island roots goes back to the 15th Century.  Kapono also talks story about music and life, and explains how his pop hit, "Only Good Times," ended up on the soundtrack of Hollywood’s first big budget surf film, "Big Wednesday," directed by John Milius.
During this half-hour long music special hosted by Heidi Chang, Kapono also performs live, singing "Silent Night" in Hawaiian.  Hawaiian culture is based on the oral tradition.  So Kapono is passing on his family’s rich cultural heritage, through his stories and music.  His island roots goes back to the 15th Century.  Kapono also talks story about music and life, and explains how his pop hit, "Only Good Times," ended up on the soundtrack of Hollywood’s first big budget surf film, "Big Wednesday," directed by John Milius.
During this half-hour long music special hosted by Heidi Chang, Kapono also performs live, singing "Silent Night" in Hawaiian.  Hawaiian culture is based on the oral tradition.  So Kapono is passing on his family’s rich cultural heritage, through his stories and music.  His island roots goes back to the 15th Century.  Kapono also talks story about music and life, and explains how his pop hit, "Only Good Times," ended up on the soundtrack of Hollywood’s first big budget surf film, "Big Wednesday," directed by John Milius.

It would be impossible to give you an in-depth Hawaiian language lesson, but it’s good to know a few words and how to pronounce them when you visit our island.
Hawaiian dish made from meat, usually pork, and butterfish, rolled up in luau leaf (similar to spinach) and steamed.
Even though I have been a student of the Hawaiian language for many years, I am still constantly amazed by the beauty as well as the simplicity, and at the same time, complexity of the language.
Then there is kauna, the hidden meaning inside Hawaiian language, wherein it seems one is speaking about something obvious when one is actually talking about something completely different.

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It was, however, the protestant missionaries from New England who first arrived in 1820 who first introduced Christmas to the Hawaiian people.
The missionaries reduced the Hawaiian language to written form, enabling the Hawaiian people to read and write in their own language.
The Hawaiian people did not celebrate Christmas prior to the arrival of Captain Cook in 1778.

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