milk jug igloo

A milk jug igloo is a great project for a classroom, nature center, library, Vacation Bible School, children’t museum, daycare center, recycling center or dozens of other places that seek to inspire children.
Cooper West kindergarten class uses milk carton igloo to emphasize fun, importance of reading – Erin Hill’s kindergarten students at Lubbock-Cooper West Elementary (Lubbock, TX) enjoy selecting books and crawling inside an igloo to read them because reading is cool.
You can easily build an milk jug igloo in your classroom with some planning, lots of milk jugs and hot glue.
Building an Igloo, Jug by Jug – Angie Grayson’s first-grade class at Fairlawn Elementary School (Evansville, IN) spent three months drinking a lot of milk to build this 499-jug igloo.
Declo student building massive milk-jug igloo – A massive, 1600-jug igloo at Dworshak Elementary School (Burley, Idaho) will be large enough to fit a classroom of 35 students inside and may qualify as the world’s largest milk jug igloo.
For example, the children in Classroom 1 at Midland Christian School (Midland, Michigan) built the 428-jug igloo shown here after collecting (and cleaning) milk cartons for about 3 weeks.
Place an Emphasis on Reading – Your completed igloo will be great for a reading nook, so you’ll want to make a special emphasis on what you read as you collect jugs and build your igloo.

Milk jug igloos are great projects for kindergartners learning about the Inuit people.
You can make igloos out of sugar cubes and icing or plastic milk jugs.

In all, the igloo took five days to build in the backyard of Miss Starrie’s parents’ home and around 150 hours of labor.
The project began back in October when Miss Starrie began collecting hundreds of milk cartons at her home in Edmonton, washing and filling them with colored water.
The Iglu-Dorf is one of seven igloo villages across the Swiss Alps where guests pay up to $299 for a night’s stay – and have access to restaurants, ice bars and hot tubs.
The idea was dreamed up by Miss Starrie’s mother Brigid Burton to keep her daughter’s boyfriend occupied during his five-week trip.
The shelter was built by Daniel Gray, who is from New Zealand, while he visited his girlfriend Kathleen Starrie in Canada.
A man has found an ingenious way to pass the long winter hours of sub-zero temperatures in Canada – by building this impressive igloo.
Mr Gray told the Global Edmonton: ‘I thought we’d just take the bricks of ice and just kind of, almost throw them out there and make an igloo.

If you want to create one with children to teach them about igloos, you can use plastic milk jugs as your building material instead of snow.

HTTP/1. build it by yourself, /1.6.2
Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2014 13:22toppable milk drinking machine, you’ll probably need a lot of friends to help by contributing their used (and washed) gallon milk containers.

Who says you need snow to build an igloo? Anderson Cooper found a couple in California that built one with milk jugs.

The first several layers can go almost straight up- just indent very slightly, using maybe one bottle less per layer.  Work out how many layers tall you want your igloo to be.  You can then multiply the base layer number by the number of almost straight layers you think you will need, to get an approximate number of bottles for this section.
You will need to be able to get hold of enough heavy cardboard (fridge and other large appliance boxes are ideal) to make a base for your igloo.  The bottom milk bottles will be glued to this to stabilise the whole structure.  So your igloo can’t be bigger than the cardboard you can get.  It can be joined however, so it doesn’t all have to be in one huge piece.
This will require some calculations.  It will depend on what size you want your igloo, and what size milk bottles you are collecting.  The people in the above video used over 400 bottles, but they were a larger size than is generally available in Australia (for those of you who live here.)  Watching the video, however, will give you some idea as to how to calculate the number.
Next, lay out the number of bottles you will need for your base layer, on the cardboard, lids facing into the circle.  Don’t forget to leave a doorway, large enough for people to easily crawl through.
Draw a circle of the right size onto the cardboard, as a guide for laying out your bottom bottles.  You can do this by attaching a pencil to a piece of string (equal to the radius of the circle you require- plus a bit extra for tying) and to an object which can either be glued or stabbed through the centre point of the circle.  Pull the string tight and your pencil should be in the correct place for drawing your outer circle.
As you get nearer the top you need to begin curving inwards much more, by staggering your bottles towards the centre more, so those layers will need progressively less bottles.  Keeping these things in mind, try to work out the number needed for the remaining layers.
Glue the first 4 bottles to the cardboard along the circle, then glue to the next 4, at the top of the side, also gluing them to the cardboard, allowing for curvature.  Continue this until the whole circle is complete, except for the doorway.

You can easily build an milk jug igloo in your classroom with some planning, lots of milk jugs and hot glue.
You can easily build an milk jug igloo in your classroom with some planning, lots of milk jugs and hot glue.
You can easily build an milk jug igloo in your classroom with some planning, lots of milk jugs and hot glue.
You can easily build an milk jug igloo in your classroom with some planning, lots of milk jugs and hot glue.
You can easily build an milk jug igloo in your classroom with some planning, lots of milk jugs and hot glue.
400 milk jugs + hot glue = igloo for "COOL" reading room for Winter Wonders! So cool.
Build an Igloo Out of Milk Jugs Build in garage or outside in the winter time.
You'll need empty (clean) milk jugs and high temp glue or hot glue/a glue gun.
You’ll need empty (clean) milk jugs and high temp glue or hot glue/a glue gun.

I saw this video over the weekend, and I the way the teachers and students at Midland Middle School reused milk jugs to create an igloo in the classroom as a reading space for kindergarteners and first graders.
Create an indoor igloo for a playhouse or reading space using cleaned-out milk jugs, cardboard, glue and some time and patience.
If you can collect enough milk jugs in time, this would be a great way to keep occupied with your kids over the upcoming holiday break from school.

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Don’t you just love creative innovation? Repurposing a bunch of plastic milk jugs into a kids’ igloo is a fun and awesome project for your classroom or in the kids’ playroom.

LESSON: My class tried out the difference in stability of using jugs with caps – and without caps.  We squeezed and stomped on them.  They found out that unsecured "flip" caps flew right off  when stomped on.  Surprise was on everyone’s face when they were unable to flatten a jug that had a TWIST cap on it! TIP 2: Make sure you use HOT melt glue.  I learned that glue guns and sticks are NOT    created equal!    Only the HIGH melt glue worked.
You can see it in the next photo.)  Lay a yardstick on the floor across the opening & hot glue it to the bottom end jugs for stability.  Connect the remaining jugs, where they touch, with HOT MELT glue.  Glue the next row of jugs on top of the previous row but stagger them across the "seam" of the 2 jugs below like bricks.   Line up the bottoms of the jugs so the "wall" goes straight up.  Later on you’ll curve it inward.
Now you’ll start the 6th row.  (Look closely and you’ll see the 2nd yardstick that was glued across the top of the doorway opening.) Do NOT line up the bottoms of the jugs to the far outside edge.  Push the jug bottom inward about 3-4 inches from the edge.  This will decrease the number of jugs you’ll need to complete the circle.  This will be the first row to go over the doorway and will begin the formation of the roof.
Continue adding rows of jugs until the igloo is 5 rows high.  Although the original directions did not include it, I hotglued a second yardstick (wrapped in masking tape so I could reuse the stick later) across the top of the door opening.  You can see it in the next photo.  Here, you only see the "floor" yardstick.
Lay about 20 milk jugs, bottoms facing outward, in a circle on the floor.  Remove 4 or 5 of them to create a doorway.  (I covered a yard stick with masking tape so I could use it again later and laid it across the opening.
TIP 3:  Do not put the glue on the jug before placing it.  Lay it in place first; look where it actually  touches the neighboring jugs and run a string of hot glue in THOSE places.

After completing our igloo we worked in groups to share what we learned and research further into the topic of recycling and igloos.  Click on the link below to learn more.

Build an adorable, functional, and very "green" space for the kids by recycling milk jugs.
this is too cute for a classroom…. even though i do not use it for my current job, i have an elementary ed degree and kids looooove stuff like this for the reading area in a classroom.
Flickr user Tombritt took this photo in a teacher’s classroom in 2007, and we can’t believe this idea didn’t take off back then.
That ideas has been around for a long time in classrooms – I know we had one in my kindergarten classroom and I’m 27 (and I’m sure they were even around before that).
it’s an interesting idea and visually kind of neat, but having garbage in my surroundings is not my idea of aesthetically pleasing, however eco-friendly it may be.
While we’ve seen several mentioned as projects for elementary school classrooms, it seems like a great project for the backyard, too.
Much easier with classrooms since we can collect from many families, but still do-able for a single family if you drink enough milk (and maybe get some from friends).

Arillaga doesn’t get into the specifics of how she built her igloo, but I was able to find some milk jug igloo instructions from another schoolteacher who did the same thing! Her igloo didn’t use as many jugs as the one at Maker Faire: only 155 of them.
At Maker Faire Bay Area, teacher Katy Arillaga built an igloo out of old milk jugs.

A milk jug igloo is a great project for a classroom, nature center, library, children’s museum, daycare center, recycling center or dozens of other places that seek to inspire children.
For example, the children in Classroom 1 at Midland Christian School (Midland, Michigan) built the 428-jug igloo shown here after collecting (and cleaning) milk cartons for about 3 weeks.
Pre-plan Your Entire Unit – Your igloo will be part of "a complete breakfast." In other words, it will complement the unit that you are teaching.–whether it’s snow, Winter, seasons, geography & cultures, ecology or some other topic.
You can easily build an milk jug igloo in your classroom with some planning, lots of milk jugs and hot glue.
Place an Emphasis on Reading – Your completed igloo will be great for a reading nook, so you’ll want to make a special emphasis on what you read as you collect jugs and build your igloo.
The milk jug igloo provides all sorts of opportunities for links to social studies, math, science and reading topics (many of which are listed below).
Promote Jug Collection – Our milk jug igloo took more than 400 milk jugs.

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All it takes is about 430 milk jugs and lots of hot glue and patience.

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The first two layers contain water and provide stability to the rest of the structure, and is built upon using layers of fewer jugs until completed.
She built a version of this recyclable structure to Makre Faire Bay Area 2011.
Make: and Maker Faire are registered trademarks of Maker Media, Inc.
Watch more videos from Maker Faire Bay Area.

Preschool students from Chesterbrook Academy in Bloomington collected more than 500 milk jugs to create "Project Igloo," a creative learning environment for the winter season.

Saw this milk jug igloo at the day care my sister works at.
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Saw this milk jug igloo at the day care my sister works at.
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If I had stopped to read just how many jugs we needed for an igloo before I showed it to my kids and mother, I might have had second thoughts, but I didn’t.
After that, we glued sets of two jugs handle sides together and then added them to the igloo.
The kids and I glued the sets of blocks together inside, and Scott glued them to the igloo outside.
Oh, and we started collecting more jugs to make another igloo.
We just glued the jugs in an arch and then glued them to the igloo.

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It took 3 weeks to collect the 428 milk jugs used to make the igloo.
A native Floridian builds an igloo on the banks of the Speed River in Guelph, Ontario.
This milk jug igloo was part of a unit on snow.
This extremely cool video will teach you how to make an extremely cool sugar cube igloo.
The Igloo Portable Ice Maker, Model is the ICE 102C Silver and it is great.
Space aliens demonstrate igloo construction.
We finally built our milk jug igloo.
Step by step guide on how to build an igloo.
Instuctional video for space aliens conducting expeditions in northern regions of planet earth.
Where does the death in the dramatic ‘Homeland’ finale rank on the list of most shocking TV deaths? Jake Tapper reports.

All you need is a general idea of what you want the igloo to look like, a bit of imagination, lots of milk jugs, a HIGH temperature hot-glue gun, glue sticks (high temp, LONG glue sticks), and a bit of patience.

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“We had all our friends and family drink the milk and save the bottles, and 1,700 bottles later, we have an igloo,” Leatherman said.

I made most of it but I have a little OCD and I am getting really frustrated that the jugs are not turning out straight and I am having trouble making the top go into a closed circle.
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Hi, I have been saving milk jugs for a couple years so I could make an igloo.

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