potato intolerance

Migraines and headaches, catching colds or becoming sick easily, depression, anxiety, moodiness, weight gain and loss, thyroid issues, stiff muscles and joints, fatigue, difficulty concentrating, diarrhea and constipation, stomach upset – the list goes on and on! When a person eliminates a food that they are intolerant to from their diet, many of these symptoms will ease or vanish entirely.

Food Allergy — potato: A potato allergy is an adverse reaction by the body’s immune system to potato or food containing potato.
More detailed information about the symptoms, causes, and treatments of Food Allergy — potato is available below.
The information on this site is not to be used for diagnosing or treating any health concerns you may have – please contact your physician or health care professional for all your medical needs.
The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients from a severe anaphylactic reaction to asthma, abdominal symptoms, eczema or headaches.

Slow reactions, which can cause all sorts of problems anywhere in the body, are not so uncommon, as I have collected thirty-nine cases over the years.. In housewives the commonest sign of a possible potato allergy is sneezing or wheezing when scraping new potatoes because this creates a fine spray of juice from the potato skin, or itching of the hands or worsening of eczema after peeling potatoes.
All skin tests were negative, but with avoidance of milk, potato, tomato, citrus fruit, and tobacco smoke she became completely free from all symptoms except when accidentally exposed.
The clue to tobacco sensitivity was that a smoky pub caused severe itching, but avoidance of milk and milk products including beef, citrus fruits, tomato and potato was necessary to bring about complete clearance.
It is remarkable that I have never found any effects which could be associated with smoking in potato sensitive patients, but I have seen cases where their allergy problems began when they stopped smoking, and this has been reported by others.

Products that sometimes contain sweet potatoes include veggie chips, which you may choose as a substitute for potato chips.
If you have celiac disease, reading labels is particularly important because many other grain products may contain potato flour, including pasta and crackers.
Many types of bread and beer yeast are made with potatoes and may produce discomfort if eaten if you have a potato intolerance.
This means that many prepared bread products you find at the grocery store contain potato, which might not appear on the label as an evident potato-containing ingredient.
Some people who have a potato intolerance may only experience symptoms when white potatoes are consumed.
A food intolerance is not the same as a food allergy, a true potato allergy could be life-threatening, while an intolerance simply produces uncomfortable digestive symptoms.
A potato intolerance is not common, but often requires eliminating potatoes from your diet.
Avoid any items that contain potato flakes or dried potatoes.
Potato flour is a gluten-free substitute for traditional breads, but it appears in many regular products as well.
Many recipes call for a can of soup to add moisture or flavor, which could result in potato intolerance symptoms.

I have on what I call a heavy carb day eaten 3-4 450+gram sweet potatoes by themselves or with various other things like meat,eggs,spinach, onions (my staples) and yes, they have made me fart a bit, but nothing horrible.
So far, everyone gets some ‘gas’ from eating sweet potatoes, depending on quantity and/or what it is eaten with.
After zero carb for a year, I started eating veg again, particularly sweet potatoes.
I went 4 months eating 2 LARGE sweet potatoes a day.
I think it may have something to do with the raffinose in sweet potatoes, which is the same gas-causing oligosaccharide found in beans and broccoli.
Could it be the salicylate content? I know sweet potatoes have a high concentration of salicylate and shouldn’t be eaten by those with a salicylate sensitivity.

This is why sufferers referred to a specialist clinic for the organ or system affected may find that the consultant does not know that food intolerance can cause problems in his speciality.
Potato is by far the commonest nightshade to cause illness, perhaps because it is such a common daily food.
This publication resulted in a steady stream of emails from all over the world describing a wide variety of illnesses caused by potato, and difficulties in convincing their doctors that potatoes could cause illness.
My first publication describing allergy and intolerance to potato was published in a specialist journal nearly thirty years ago but aroused no interest whatever, in contrast to the response to publication on the internet in Foods Matter in 2004.
An added bonus has been that when his father and the grandson were persuaded to avoid potato and all nightshade plants, father’s life-long problems disappeared, and grandson’s asthma also improved considerably.
It would appear that he was already aware of some of his food intolerances, but had never considered the humble potato as the most important cause.
If the cause is a food or foods the drugs might be withdrawn without relapse of the chronic problem being treated.
This approach applies to any food intolerance as well as potato, and nutritional deficiencies do not occur in only three weeks.
Most people can eat potatoes without harm, but it is not widely known that the potato is a member of the Nightshade group of plants, which includes deadly nightshade, tobacco, peppers, tomatoes, aubergines, and chillies.
Reliable blood tests for intolerance to foods have not been invented, so do not waste money on the tests advertised or available in the health food shops.
Since potatoes were brought to Europe from South America over 500 years ago it has become a common food to the extent that the United Nations declared 2008 the "Year of The Potato" because of its worldwide importance as a nutritious food.
He was then instructed to live on a diet including only the few foods that rarely cause allergy or intolerance, and he remained well on this regime, and feels he has been given a new lease of life.
These comments apply only to food intolerance, where the food triggers a delayed reaction the following day and normal amounts of the suspect food are required to cause a reaction.
A grandson aged 23 has chronic asthma and had noted that spicy food caused colic and diarrhoea, probably due to chillies.
The restricted few foods diet should continue while test feeds are given to confirm which food, or foods, reproduce the symptoms.
Bloating, wind, colic, and diarrhoea, often labelled as "IBS" (Irritable Bowel Syndrome) are common manifestations of the effects on the gut which would be expected if a common food was irritating the bowels.
Seven years ago Foods Matter published my description of the remarkable effects of potato on thirty-nine patients who were either allergic or intolerant of potato.
His eighty years old father had had lifelong "IBS", had had asthma and eczema when younger, he could not eat tomatoes because his mouth reacted to them, and he could not tolerate being in the same room as peppers, both members of the nightshade family.
Several close relatives have food problems, including a cousin who gets eczema if she eats red tomatoes, not yellow ones, and has a craving for tomato sauce which results in eczema within two hours.
Everyone wants the magic pill to banish their all their ills, but in chronic problems such as asthma or arthritis drugs only suppress symptoms, may cause side-effects, and never cure.
He was aware that a trace of milk or butter would cause severe asthma in half an hour, followed six hours later by bloating, colic, nausea, and finally terminated by diarrhoea.
Inhalers containing steroid drugs in lactose powder, which may contain a trace of milk protein, caused asthma and he suspected that other foods might be involved .
If the complaints do not improve you have shown that food allergy or intolerance is very unlikely, so go back on a normal diet and forget it.

He has been having trouble with anxiety and it is believed to be linked with this problem with potatoes.

Potato has been more difficult to pin down as I seem to be fine with new potatoes but react badly to old potatoes —– or is this because new potatoes tend to be white ones and old ones red? As far as I can tell the other members of the nightshade family are tolerated although cooked tomatoes are better than raw ones and summer ones better than hot house winter ones! It seems to be almost a lifetime’s project finding and maintaining a diet that agrees! Thank you everyone who has posted here.
Hurray I am not alone! I self-diagnosed my potato intolerance after a drop of potato juice squirted in my eye about 20 years ago causing severe pain –as well my hands always became red and itchy when I peeled potatoes.
Just before I was gonna leave for UK I met a doc who told me to stop eating Potato and Onions for 12 days and take a medicine for 12 days.. he gave me 1 tab a day.. I never knew was it was but i felt my life was back.. But after the course and when i came back to uk… things starting to get back to how it was .. bad bad and even bad with ecema and porasis on my whole body even on my face.. well well well.. I dont know if its too early to make a conclusion in my case but i have been off potato since 5 weeks since my wife made a suggestion and i have never felt better in my life.
I also have a potato intolerance – I have now avoided potatoes for 13 years, and if I ever break down and have a few french fries or potato chips I get symptoms within a few hours.
It’s frustrating that modern medicine can often discount food intolerances when trying to find the cause of medical conditions, particularly when you’ve been on anti biotics for years! This just goes to show that looking at your diet and the effect foods are having on your body should definitely be considered as part of the investigation when people are suffering from medical conditions.
Potatoes are a great, cheap staple and so long as we keep the portion size sensible and don’t add saturated fats (as may be the case with roast potatoes, potato salad, etc), they are a very healthy part of a balanced diet, especially for those for whom wheat or gluten is off the menu.
So, one can see that I’m trying to avoid so many things, that it feels like I’m left drinking purified water, and eating fruits, rice, cheese, meat and fish in their most blandest forms because I cannot have so many ingredients because of corn, potato, and for the sake of my husband, gluten.
There are alot of ingredients in a pot noodle – can you be sure it was the potato starch that caused your diarrhoea? To properly test the theory you need to reintroduce a small quantity without any other potential problems foods – but this should only be done with intolerances, not allergies as allergic reactions can be serious.
I also, like Midge, was two days ago diagnosed through the Carroll Food Intolerance test by my Naturopath as not having the enzyme in my body for processing potato, hence potato intolerance.

There are grains and other flours that do not contain gluten that can be used in place of these, such as: Corn, Millet, Rice, Taro, Teff, Arrowroot, Tapioca, Wild Rice, Buckwheat, Quinoa, Barley Malt, Wheat Grass, Barley Grass, and Amaranth.
Also, all products made from fruit, such as wine, vinegar (wine or apple cider), fruit liquors, citric acid, acetic acid, (from apple), cranberries, coconut, avocado, dates, olives, papaya, palm, and all oils, barks, peels, etc.
By fish I mean any fish or shell fish, or any foods or supplements that contain fish products or fish oils, including sushi, caviar, fish oil supplements, anchovies, and some tomato products.
Avoid these grains and anything made from them, such as liquors, malt vinegar, malto-dextrin, beer, noodles, bread, wheat germ, or bran, etc.
Also, anything made from them, such as liquor, malt vinegar, malto-dextrin, beer, noodles, bread, wheat germ or bran, etc.
Almost all canned tomato products contain citric acid and should be treated as fruit: read labels.

I have an intolerance to nightshades, Potatoes used to be my worse, but I have noticed I am not reacting as much, I have been taking alot of supplements over the past 16 months which I believe have helped this, although tomatoes and Paprika still cause terrible stomach pain and bloating.
My current bad list is: gluten, dairy, sulfites, coffee (the devil's brew), tea, Bug's Bunnies carrots, garbanzo beans of pain, soy- no joy, terrible turnips, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, and hard work.
I've been able to eat potatoes for 46 years and I potatoes! Recently, I've been getting bloat and diarrhea, and I know I'm lactose intolerant so I gave up butter and milk, and had them plain with a little sprinkle of pepper on top.
I know that some Allergists will help with an elimination diet (but I haven't found one), and a Naturopathic doctor will also help (but they don't take insurance).
I did a test to be sure I was, by not eating any potatoes for a couple of weeks, then eating some very simple, bland foods (rice, bananas, gluten-free bread, etc) for a couple days to calm my system down.

The hospital consultant I was seeing (a consultant nephrologist and clinical ecologist) was studying food intolerances and allergies and had only recently added potatoes to his list of possibilities, after a chance remark from his secretary who said that she always felt sleepy when she had baked potato for lunch.
I have met a couple of people who can't eat tomatoes but don't have a problem with potatoes or peppers, or vice versa.
If you have a potato intolerance, then you will have to be very careful with so-called gluten-free products – potatoes are gluten-free and are often used as a wheat substitute in, for instance, bread.
I can't eat any nightshade plant, including potatoes, tomatoes, peppers (all except for black pepper which is not an "official" pepper), eggplant, tobacco, or kava kava.
Airlines, for instance, only ever seem to offer bread made with potato flour if you specify a gluten-free diet – I always have to take my own food as I just can't trust them and the flight attendants never know what the ingredients are.
I also wonder whether the dietary advice during the awful 'wholemeal' 60 's and 70's when wheat bran was added to nearly everything, coming on top of war-time waste-not-want-not attitudes isn't to blame – we had it drummed into us that the best part of any fruit or vegetable was immediately under the skin and therefore we had to eat the skin to be sure of getting the only real nutrition….. this during a time when all kinds of pesticides and fertilizers which have subsequenly been banned because they are deadly poisonous were in common if not universal use.
Yes, agree it's hard to avoid potato starch when eating gluten free bread.
I dunno… I've been trying to find any bit of info on this for years now – all I can find is that nightshade veggies stimulate the immune system, especially with arthritis, and are not all that good for people who have these kinds of problems.
But over the years I had gotten sick after the potatoes too (even the smell of my mom frying them would make me queasy) and had asked my mom and doctors if it was possible to be allergic to them, knowing I was probably crazy.
So, I've recently come off of the gluten challenge and have been keeping a food journal to identify any other food allergies/intolerances.
So, I've recently come off of the gluten challenge and have been keeping a food journal to identify any other food allergies/intolerances.
In the past I had gotten the "flu" several times after eating russet potatoes with the skins on them, throwing up and having lots of cramps within a few hours of eating them.
I have an extreme reaction to white potatoes and potato starch.
I don't really like tomatoes or peppers, and it's hard to find decent eggplant where I live, so I don't know if it's because I am intolerant to nightshades, but I assume that is the problem.

It is possible that the oral allergy syndrome reactions you are experiencing with potatoes may be also caused by a cross-reaction within this family especially when dealing with tomatoes and eggplants.
If you are having any symptoms when dealing with uncooked potatoes it is most likely you are experiencing oral allergy syndrome symptoms rather than a true allergy.
Quickly this can become confusing and leave you wondering…which is it? Is an allergy to potatoes caused by tree pollen, grass pollen, or latex? The short answer is potentially all of them.
Recently we received a question about  oral allergy syndrome cross-reactions that cause an allergy to potatoes.
Fortunately having an allergy to potatoes is very rare and in many cases is caused by oral allergy syndrome.
Something else to consider when determining the cause of an allergy to potatoes is a potential cross-reaction of foods within the same family.
If you have searched the internet about oral allergy syndrome and an allergy to potatoes you will quickly see some conflicting information.
Oral allergy syndrome is a type of food allergy that causes an itching, allergic reaction to the lips, mouth, tongue, and throat when eating uncooked fruits, vegetables, and nuts.
In 1977 research showed a cross-reaction between birch pollen (tree pollen) and uncooked potatoes and in 1983 further research showed that there was also a cross-reaction between grass pollen and uncooked potatoes.

I have 4 children and literally after I gave birth in the hospital to my daughter who is now 14 1/2, I became allergic to potatoes, even though I ate them all my life.[br>I didn’t know it right away because I didn’t eat potatoes all that often but when I did, I would have a terrible reaction…..my heart would start racing, then my throat would close up some….lips tingle….but I never was aware of food allergies and didn’t know what was happening….at the time, I also had a lot going on so I thought it was panic attacks.
I have 4 children and literally after I gave birth in the hospital to my daughter who is now 14 1/2, I became allergic to potatoes, even though I ate them all my life.[br>I didn’t know it right away because I didn’t eat potatoes all that often but when I did, I would have a terrible reaction…..my heart would start racing, then my throat would close up some….lips tingle….but I never was aware of food allergies and didn’t know what was happening….at the time, I also had a lot going on so I thought it was panic attacks.
So over the years, I avoided them and as long as it wasn’t a fry, potato chip, baked potato, mashed….I never read labels.[br>Last week, I was eating jolly ranchers chewy candy and after a few, started to have a terrible reaction.[br>I grabbed the pack and read the and saw it ingredients had potato starch.
So over the years, I avoided them and as long as it wasn’t a fry, potato chip, baked potato, mashed….I never read labels.[br>Last week, I was eating jolly ranchers chewy candy and after a few, started to have a terrible reaction.[br>I grabbed the pack and read the and saw it ingredients had potato starch.

I first found out that I was allergic to potatoes after going to an asthma and allergy specialist for severe chest pains and random throat swelling.
Even bizarre things, like envelope glue, contain potato starch. For people with very severe potato allergies, figuring out what products contain potato can be very difficult.

My mom did some research, and found out that there was potato starch in a medication I was taking daily! My allergist said that there was "no way" I could be allergic to the potato starch, since it is supposedly the protein that causes an allergic reaction.
I have always been allergic to potatos and potato products (potato flour and potato starch etc.). I cannot eat them or breathe them when they are coking.
All my life I’ve avoided potatoes, potato starch and potato flour.
I have also had to check the non-medicinal contents of certain pills which may contain corn starch – so far no potato starches.
My mother did not believe the dismissive doctor, so she called the manufacturer of potato starch.

Allergic reactions to food may manifest in the form of nausea, vomiting, flatulence, abdominal pain, cramping, diarrhoea and with non gastrointestinal illnesses such as rashes, eczema, swelling, nasal allergy, wheeze, angioedema and in some cases, even life threatening anaphylaxis.
Eggs and cows milk seem to be the commonest causes of food allergy followed by peanut and wheat.
Potential food allergens in the diet, such as cows milk, soya, citrus and wheat, should be avoided for the first year of life, with eggs, peanuts and bony fish being introduced only after 2-3 years of age.
There is still considerable controversy as to whether the hyper-activity syndrome and migraine are allergic in nature – so far scientific evidence is in conflict, but so-called Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (M.E.) and the Chronic Systemic Candidiasis syndrome do not appear to have any food allergy basis.
Phadia Diagnostics market a number of food allergy screening tests such as Total IgE and the CAP RAST fx5 Paediatric Food Mix which tests for 6 common paediatric food allergens (Milk, Egg, Wheat, Peanut, Soya and Peanut).
Practitioners should be aware of the fact that the publicity and “popularity” surrounding food allergy has spawned a new form of “Munchausen by proxy” – where the parent, convinced that their child’s symptoms are secondary to food allergy, institutes bizarre and nutritionally deficient diets.
Food allergy prevention measures should only be considered in babies with one or both parents manifesting definite allergic disease.
This may reduce food allergen reactivity and slow the so-called “Allergy March” onto Eczema, Asthma and Nasal Allergy which are common sequels to food allergy.
Sometimes the apparent allergy provoking food is not the cause but another co-existent allergy, such as allergy to the Cod Worm parasite (Anasakis simplex) in fish mimicking a typical fish allergy, or allergy to the red spider mite on tomatoes or grapes being the allergen and not that food.
The most effective form of food allergy prevention in the “at risk” infant is unsupplemented breast-feeding for at least the first four to six months of age.
The true prevalence of food allergy is lower and seems to range from 1% to 4% of the general population and about 6% of the paediatric population, but does occur in as much as 25% of children with eczema.
Allergic sensitization to food will occur in infants if there is a breach in the bowel surface integrity followed by an adverse immune response to a foreign food protein penetrating the intestinal surface.
The diagnosis is dependent on a clinical history suggestive of food allergy, with symptom improvement on withdrawing the offending food from the diet.
Although these foods are more commonly implicated in food allergy, almost any food can be a potential allergen.
Most food allergic children eventually tolerate milk, eggs and vegetables but usually remain allergic to fish and nuts.
This may present with Reflux Oesophagitis and Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis with delayed reactions to Cow’s Milk, Hen’s Egg, Soy and Wheat manifesting in projectile vomiting, bloody diarrhoea and cramping colic, addominal pain and food refusal.
The diagnostic “gold standard” in food allergy is the double blind placebo controlled food challenge test (DBPCFC).
Infants tend more commonly to develop allergies to hen egg white, cow’s milk protein, wheat, peanuts, bony fish, sesame and even soy protein, whilst adults tend to be allergic to foods such as bony fish, shellfish, peanuts, tree nuts, tomatoes and kiwi.
Food intolerance may also manifest with the inability to adequately digest the cow’s milk sugar Lactose, Fructose found in fruit juices and Gluten in wheat, resulting in cramping abdominal pain, offensive diarrhoea and failure to thrive in especially in childhood.
This is true food allergy and accounts for 20% of all adverse reactions to food.
Therefore the strictness of the diet often depends on the severity of the food allergy symptoms.
Delayed non-IgE mediated food allergy in infants have become more common.
Finally, cautious re-introduction of a “prohibited” food can be attempted after 6-12 months as the natural history of food allergy is for gradual improvement.

I was diagnosed 5 years ago, I can say this is very real for me because I was definitely experiencing all the food intolerance type symptoms but after knowing all there is to know on what to avoid, my problems have disappeared! There is a free resource you might want to check out to see if it works for you too: Click on “View custom food list, with only items you can eat.” and then select “Potato” as your main food intolerance…also keep in mind that some people can have a secondary food intolerance that kind of bothers them a little.
Other potato derivatives may include “modified food starch,” “hydrolyzed vegetable protein,” “vegetable broth,” MSG (also labeled as “monosodium glutamate” or “natural flavorings”), “propylene glycol,” some plastic wraps or food storage bags (so that they are biodegradable, apparently), and penicillin-type antibiotics.
(Because it has been a while and I did not immediately write it down, I cannot recall what they told me it is cultured on, but they did specify.) [Update 12/2/13: Reader Jenn had this to say: "I don’t know if things are different in canada compared to the united states, but I talked to the company, and this is what they said about their yeast: ‘Potato starch is used as a filter media during the dewatering process.
I don’t know if things are different in canada compared to the united states, but I talked to the company, and this is what they said about their yeast: “Potato starch is used as a filter media during the dewatering process.

The only nightshade vegetable humans eat is the potato; the rest of the nightshades (other than tobacco, which is smoked, not eaten) are fruits, because they contain seeds—eggplant, tomatoes, goji and peppers.
Peppers, because they are fruits and because they are in a different subfamily than the rest of the nightshade foods, may contain much less glycoalkaloid? Or none at all? Peppers are famous for containing hot and spicy “capsaicinoids”, not glycoalkaloids (I’ll write about peppers and capsaicinoids in a future article).
Also, since glycoalkaloids have the ability to burst cells open, they can theoretically cause damage to the cells that line your digestive system as they are passing through (this has been proven in animal studies but there are no human studies, to my knowledge).
There are ZERO scientific articles about nightshade sensitivity, chronic pain, or arthritis in the literature, however, the internet is full of anecdotal reports of people who have found that nightshades aggravate arthritis, fibromyalgia, or other chronic pain syndromes.
Another reason why many people may not be bothered by potatoes is that glycoalkaloids are very poorly absorbed by the gastrointestinal tract, so, if you have a healthy digestive tract, most of the glycoalkaloid won’t make it into your bloodstream.

“Carbohydrate intolerance, the inability to metabolise sugar found in carbohydrates, may lead to a build-up of fat deposits on muscle tissue, which can cause a person to gain weight and, eventually, impair physical endurance,” said study co-author Emile F.
Carbohydrate intolerance also plays part in obese people, where the inability to process carbohydrates properly leads to decreased level of fitness and increased metabolic disorders due to accumulation of fat around the muscles.
A new study published in the CHEST, a journal of the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP), showed that severely obese men were more carbohydrate intolerant and had less physical endurance than severely obese women, leading researchers to believe that gender plays a strong role in physical fitness and a person's ability to metabolise carbohydrates.
There are three type of carbohydrates, classified according to their structure, monosaccharides – based on one unit of sugar such as glucose and fructose, disaccharides – two units of sugars joined together such as lactose, and polysaccharides – a complex carbohydrate with many units joined together as in starch and glycogen, see figure on the right.
“It appears that carbohydrate intolerance is more common in obese men, which would cause them to be less physically fit than obese women.” Researchers also assessed patients for carbohydrate intolerance, according to American Diabetes Society Guidelines.

Rather than a food ‘allergy’, celiac / coeliac disease is a specific type of food intolerance – to gluten – that can lead to increased risk of other food intolerances and allergies due to the damage to the gut.
Looking back on it now, I had been suffering from the symptoms of food intolerance for 2 years at least, probably longer, before I realised it wasn’t just ‘hidden gluten’ causing my problems.
However, other food intolerances began to crop up in my thoughts more and more as, despite my strictly gluten free diet, I felt worse and worse.
I called a friend who is a bit of a nutrition fiend and she confirmed that allergy to the deadly nightshade food group is fairly common (this includes aubergines, potatoes, tomatoes and bell peppers).
I bought a book called "Is what you eat making you ill" by Patrick Holford, which explained the difference between ‘classic’ food allergy (or IgE allergy) and slow-onset food intolerance (or IgG allergy).
Travelling coeliacs send me stories of getting gluten free food in other countries all the time.

If he tolerates spinach and wheat bran, it seems unlikely that the oxalate in sweet potatoes would be responsible.
This may reflect an immature gut flora in the infants; perhaps specific bacterial species — possibly including the oxalate-digesting Oxalobacter [9] — make sweet potatoes tolerable? If so, it raises the possibility that adults with incomplete gut flora might also have sweet potato sensitivities.
Sweet potatoes do contain oxalate, although they are not the only plant foods which do.
Ipomeanine (IPN), 4-ipomeanol (4-IPO), 1-ipomeanol (1-IPO), and 1,4-ipomeadiol (DIOL) are toxic 3-substituted furans found in mold-damaged sweet potatoes.
Sweet potatoes contain phytoalexins that can cause lung edema and are hepatotoxic to mice.

(Not suitable for your supervised elimination diet • for people who can tolerate limited amounts of salicylates: fancy lettuce such as butter lettuce) Internet rumours that Iceberg lettuce represents inferior nutrition are not true, Iceberg lettuce contains the same nutrients but more water which is why it is so crisp.
Marrow (vegetable), also called squash (Not suitable for your supervised elimination diet • for people who can tolerate moderate salicylates) This group includes zucchini if peeled and butternut pumpkin but not other pumpkins which are now rated as High in salicylates.
Using your salicylate and amine mistakes information sheets and the product updates on the fed up site, I have so far picked up the following errors: Coles Pears in Syrup snackpacks (contained pear juice), Simply Wize Crusty Bread (maize flour), Dovedale Rice & Chia Bread (Chia seeds), and the wrong Cenovis multivitamin (Once Daily Women’s Multi, contains evening primrose oil).
Reader story: You actually brought tears to my eyes when l read that you don’t need fruit, vegetables are best!!!! Before l knew my problem was food, l used to eat sooo many fruits and vegetables l was sooo sick all of the time, but the sicker l got the more fruit and vegies l would eat.
Mangoes formerly moderate in salicylates have been upgraded to High (contain both salicylates and amines* Not suitable for your supervised elimination diet) RPA advise that people who are already managing foods formerly listed as moderate in their diets can continue to eat them.

Clean Eating Freedom Brownies 1/3 cup coconut flour 1/3 cup unsweetened cocoa powder 1/3 cup coconut oil 5 whole eggs 1/2 cup maple syrup 2 tsp.
Clean Eating Freedom Brownies 1/3 cup coconut flour 1/3 cup unsweetened cocoa powder 1/3 cup coconut oil 5 whole eggs 1/2 cup maple syrup 2 tsp.
pure vanilla extract 1– In a medium mixing bowl, whisk together the coconut flour and cocoa powder.
pure vanilla extract 1– In a medium mixing bowl, whisk together the coconut flour and cocoa powder.
What You Need 1 tablespoon chili powder 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder 1/4 teaspoon onion powder 1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes 1/4 teaspoon of cayenne pepper 1/2 teaspoon paprika 2 teaspoons ground cumin 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon black pepper What To Do Mix all ingredients together.

Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting.
We had skin prick tests done today.  DD2 has allergies to Dairy, eggs, peanuts, treenuts and potato.  We've been given adrenoline and needles should the need ever arise.  She's too little for the epipen Jnr.  DD2 is 7.4kg and you need to be 10kgs.
Hi All and thanks for your replies.  It is suspected that DD2 will grow out of her potato, dairy and egg allergies, but there is only a slim chance that she'll outgrow the peanut allergy.  That is the main reason we have the adrenalin.  We are starting her on solids this week (pumpkin).
I looked like i was 9 months pregnant, the hospital didn't believe me and thought I was in labour, they did two pregnancy tests before the agreed I wasn't pregnant.  Very frustrating.  I screamed the hospital down for a good few hours,Then they finally gave me lots of morphine, x-rays and some laxatives.  Took a few days but I got over it.
Access our very active mum’s discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle.
I just thought this was such a random thing to be allergic to.  What is it about the potato that causes the allergic reaction?  I forgot to ask at the appointment.
For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.

Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting.
Access our very active mum’s discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle.
For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.
Ollie has ezcema and both potato and sweet potato seem to contribute to a flair up particularly on his cheeks.  I mentioned it to the skin specialist last week and she said it is not as common as the obvious (wheat, dairy etc) but she does see it.  He also had a more obvious reaction to a rusk (he vomited and got welts all over his groin area ) so we are steering clear of wheat, dairy, eggs, nuts (obviously) and potato till we have him tested at 12 months.

Hmm…I have fibromyalgia and I’ve found that eliminating sugar has been a huge help for my joint stiffness, but I wonder if eliminating nightshade would help, too? I have to admit, I’m not sure I even want to know if I need to eliminate tomatoes and those spices from my diet! It must be really tough.
I have been suffering from knee and pain in my hips for the past ten years and it was 2 years ago I stumbled across an article on the internet about the nightshade family of foods and I stopped eating them and within days I felt I had got my life back!.
Great article! I’ve been off the nightshades for about 2 months (a tiny slip here or there…) Something I’m doing is really helping with my Lupus symptoms – I can’t say for sure this is it – but I suspect it is part of it.

Tags: