stuffed cabbage

Ground pork is mixed with sauteed caramelized onions and rice stuffed in a cabbage leaf, pickled sauerkraut leaf or grape leaf.
Kåldolmar are Swedish cabbage rolls filled with minced pork meat, and in some cases rice.
Sarmale are Romanian stuffed cabbage rolls traditionally served on Christmas and New Year’s Eve but also served throughout the year at weddings, baptism parties, and other large celebrations.
The traditional Hungarian cabbage roll (töltött káposzta) can be made from pickled cabbage leaves, filled with minced pork meat.
In Egyptian cuisine, cabbage rolls are called محشي كرمب, pronounced maḥshī kromb or maḥshī koronb (as Standard Arabic [m] often turns to [n] in proximity to [b] in Egyptian Arabic), literally translating to "stuffed cabbage".
In Lebanon, it is a popular plate, where the cabbage is stuffed with rice and minced meat and only rolled to the size of cigar.
In regions heavily influenced by Polish immigrants, such as northern Pennsylvania, the southern tier of New York, and northeastern Ohio, the term usually refers instead to stuffed cabbage rolls, such as the Polish gołąbki.
Cabbage leaves are stuffed with the filling which are then baked, simmered, or steamed in a covered pot and generally eaten warm, often accompanied with a sauce.
In Sweden "Kåldolmens dag" (Day of the Cabbage Roll) is celebrated on 30 November, the death day of Charles XII of Sweden and since the 1930s a day marked by Nazi manifestations, with the purpose stated by its initiators to hail the multifaceted Swedish cultural heritage involving national symbols with immigrant background.
Sweet shredded cabbage layers in between the rolls of pickled cabbage leaves or sauerkraut layers in between of sweet cabbage leafs.
Pork and beef mixed with rice or barley are nestled in a cabbage leaf and cooked in the oven or on the stove until tender.
A cabbage roll (also known as pigs in a blanket) is a dish consisting of cooked cabbage leaves wrapped around a variety of fillings.
Typical Ukrainian cabbage rolls can be made from either pickled or parboiled cabbage leaves.
Hungarians serve this food during the periods of time near Christmas and New Year’s, but stuffed cabbage also belongs to the traditional pig slaughter.
The Russian version of cabbage rolls usually consists of cooked meatballs wrapped in cabbage leaves.
Always in Sweden and sometimes in Finland, stuffed cabbage is served with lingonberry jam, which is both sweet and tart.

In a large bowl, combine tomato puree and the reserved 2 cups of cabbage cooking water.
Place sour cream in a small bowl, and ladle in about 3/4 cup of tomato sauce from the cooked stuffed cabbage rolls.
Return cabbage to boiling water, and repeat brief cooking and removal of leaves until all leaves are cooked.
Add cabbage and cook 2 to 3 minutes or until outer leaves are bright green and tender.
Cook for 1 hour or until cabbage is very tender, adding additional tomato sauce as needed.
Lift cabbage from water, and remove outer leaves.
Transfer stuffed cabbage leaves to Dutch oven.

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Reserve 14-16 large leaves for rolls and set aside remaining cabbage.
After making the rolls, I chop up the leftover cabbage and line the pan with the cabbage.
"IN OUR area of Pennsylvania, cabbage rolls are frequently served at special occasions of all kinds.
Spoon sauce over rolls and cabbage and serve immediately.
Stack cabbage rolls on top of sauce.
Combine remaining soup and water; pour over cabbage.
1 serving (3 each) equals 254 calories, 7 g fat (3 g saturated fat), 39 mg cholesterol, 755 mg sodium, 30 g carbohydrate, 6 g fiber, 19 g protein.
Cook cabbage in boiling water only until leaves fall off head.
1 serving (3 each) equals 254 calories, 7 g fat (3 g saturated fat), 39 mg cholesterol, 755 mg sodium, 30 g carbohydrate, 6 g fiber, 19 g protein.
Line a Dutch oven with leftover cabbage leaves.
Remove rolls and cabbage.

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Once the water is boiling, completely submerge the cabbage and cook, covered, 7 to 9 minutes, or until softened and pliable.
Once the water is boiling, completely submerge the cabbage and cook, covered, 7 to 9 minutes, or until softened and pliable.
While the sauce is cooking, in the pot used to cook the cabbage, heat 2 teaspoons of olive oil on medium until hot.
While the sauce is cooking, in the pot used to cook the cabbage, heat 2 teaspoons of olive oil on medium until hot.
Heat to boiling on high, then cover, reduce the heat to low and simmer 15 to 17 minutes, or until all the liquid is absorbed and the rice is tender.
Season with salt and pepper and cook, stirring occasionally, 5 to 7 minutes, or until slightly reduced in volume.
Season with salt and pepper and cook, stirring occasionally, 5 to 7 minutes, or until slightly reduced in volume.
Heat to boiling on high, then cover, reduce the heat to low and simmer 15 to 17 minutes, or until all the liquid is absorbed and the rice is tender.
Cook 1 to 2 minutes, and season with salt and pepper to taste.
Cook 1 to 2 minutes, and season with salt and pepper to taste.
While the cabbage is cooking, in a separate, medium pot, heat 2 teaspoons of olive oil on medium until hot.
While the cabbage is cooking, in a separate, medium pot, heat 2 teaspoons of olive oil on medium until hot.
Increase the heat to medium-high, add the ground beef and season with salt and pepper.
Increase the heat to medium-high, add the ground beef and season with salt and pepper.

Place half the cabbage rolls, seam sides down, over the sauce.
For the sauce, heat the olive oil in a large saucepan, add the onions, and cook over medium-low heat for 8 minutes, until the onions are translucent.
Immerse the head of cabbage in the boiling water for a few minutes, peeling off each leaf with tongs as soon as it s flexible.
Remove the hard triangular rib from the base of each cabbage leaf with a small paring knife.
Place 1/3 to 1/2 cup of filling in an oval shape near the rib edge of each leaf and roll up toward the outer edge, tucking the sides in as you roll.
For the filling, in a large bowl, combine the ground chuck, eggs, onion, breadcrumbs, rice, thyme, salt, and pepper.
Pour the remaining sauce over the cabbage rolls.
Add more sauce and more cabbage rolls alternately until you ve placed all the cabbage rolls in the pot.

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roll into the leaves like you show, we would also stuff a few green peppers…then we would put polish or hungarian sausage into the pot with saurkraut (a must) and petite diced tomatoes on top of the rolls with enough water to cover, bring to a boil, turn it down and let it cook all day! Just writing this takes me back to any given holiday when we would always have a huge pot of stuffed cabbage for the meal.
I too, stuffed cabbage! But my family (half Polish, half Russian) made them different than any other recipe I have ever found.
My Bobbe and mother made Cholopchkes that were sweet and sour – Sour salt AND lemon juice, and white sugar, because I don’t think they had brown sugar back before the Revolution! They used tomato juice and canned whole tomatoes, and NO raisins.
Last time I made them, I found that cutting out the core of the cabbage, filling with water (after a good rinse) and putting core side up in a plastic colander (over a microwave safe plate with a good size lip) allowed me to microwave the cabbage heads instead of boiling.
I’m drooling! That looks so so good! My mother would make stuffed cabbage (known as cabbage rolls in my family), but she would bake them.
My mother made cabbage rolls much like this Tori’s but she had a friend who used a bottle of chili sauce and a jar of grape jelly, mixed and simmering, in which to cook meatballs.
Tori, love this post, and I love stuffed cabbage leaves! My grandmother used to make this dish all the time.
I love stuffed cabbage leaves, I make a veggie version with rice, feta, raisins, almonds, mint and cinnamon.
And they both used an oval roaster in the oven, because they usually made triple the recipe above! In later years, my mother adjusted the recipe from putting the cabbage in boiling water, to putting it in the freezer a couple of days ahead of cooking day, and taking it out the night before.
Tori, I made your cabbage rolls and they were fantastic! I saw the photos you posted (was drooling), and with the weather getting chilly, figured it was the perfect dinner to make and it was! Thank you for posting it, and all your other fabulous recipes.
One thing I’ve found is that I like a stuffed cabbage that is less sweet and more tart.
That means I’ve made stuffed cabbage over a dozen different ways.
I grew up eating the stuffed cabbage made by my Slovenian American mom, who grew up in Cleveland, which sounds very similar to what Bonnie posted above.

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Come home to our favorite main dishes, sides, appetizers, and drinks that are sure to soothe your family with the simple joys of comfort food.

Stick a long cooking fork into the core hole of the large cabbage, and plunge it (carefully, so you don’t splash yourself) into the pot of rapidly boiling water.
While bringing the water to a boil, use a thin, sharp knife to make deep cuts around the core of the large cabbage (cut into the cabbage in a circle about 1/4 inch out from the core).
Be sure to align the spines of inner and outer leaves.) Stuff with 3/4 cup of the meat-rice mixture, roll very tightly along the spine, and close both sides by tucking them in with your fingers.
The cooking liquid is very soupy at the end, but I’m not a fan of cornstarch, so I covered the cabbage rolls and kept them warm in the oven while I reduced the liquid for 30 minutes.

On Jack’s side of the family – Italian fare was the standard, so recipes like beef braciole and lasagna were part of many holiday meals! On my side of the family – I clearly remember making classic spritz cookies and peanut goodies with my mom, and being Polish, we always served kielbasa, pierogi and golumpki (pronounced (gaw-WOHMP-kee) – or what is more commonly known in the United States as stuffed cabbage rolls.
This recipe uses brown rice – making it a healthier version – and a mixture of ground beef, pork and veal (if you prefer not to use veal, just replace that with additional ground pork), as well as chopped cabbage and sauerkraut.

Combine the remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt, remaining 1/8 teaspoon pepper, apple juice, vinegar, and tomatoes; pour evenly over cabbage rolls.
Place cabbage leaves on a flat surface; spoon about 1/3 cup barley mixture into center of each cabbage leaf.
Trimming away part of the thick center vein from the cabbage leaves makes them more pliable and easier to roll up.
Cut off raised portion of the center vein of each cabbage leaf (do not cut out vein); set trimmed cabbage leaves aside.
Remove 16 leaves from cabbage head; discard remaining cabbage.

Given that we’re entering a transition period, I’ve chosen to turn a summertime staple—bratwurst—on its head, removing it from its casings and then browning the sausage meat and tossing it with rice for cabbage rolls.
She writes the Sunday Supper column for Serious Eats and regularly contributes food features to Chicago Sun-Times.
Bratwurst and rice-stuffed cabbage rolls bake in a smoky bacon-beer tomato sauce.

Love your show I have just started watching it, You are great keep up the good work and keep the show rolling, I”m cooking the cabbage tonight can”t wait till it get done.
My boss referred me to watch your show Fruit of New Mexico as he knows my love for cooking and he likes to keep me enthused for peppers (He owns EDCO Food Products, Inc.-We sell Kosher Pepper and pickle products from MX).
I love the show specially your recipes Chef Staib.. I will like to get the recipes for the cod fish you cook in the Bahamas with coconut milk and the Lobster,scallops and shripm pie.
Slip the cabbage & any reserved pouter leaves into the pot, return it to a boil, & cook until the outer leaves soften & can be pulled back easily.
I am permanently disabled and I really love your show and I pray for your continued success… Like others on here though I would love to know what the recipe for the special ketchup that you talk about and use on the show to add great flavor to many of your dishes.
I love the old recipes and your show is such a wonderful tutorial for cooking skills as well as U.S. history.
Love your show, I’m not a venison fan, but would love to see more beef recipes, dumplings, gravy.

To cook: Steam the cabbage over water or good chicken stock (about 2 cups/500 ml of it) for 45 minutes.
The flavor from the stuffed cabbage will drip into the water or stock and give it the most amazing flavor.
You’re going to reconstruct the cabbage, but with layers of stuffing between the leaves.
After making this dish, it's now my favorite recipe for stuffed cabbage.
Blanch the cabbage leaves for 5 to 7 minutes.
Pull up the edges of the cheesecloth, like a bag, and twist, as if making the head of a puppet, to shape the cabbage into a round loaf shape.
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When the cabbage is done, boil down the cooking juices and serve a spoonful around each wedge of cabbage in a soup bowl.
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Lay a tea towel on the counter with a piece of cheesecloth or muslin large enough to wrap the cabbage in.
Tie a string around the beard of cheesecloth where it meets the cabbage ball, to secure the package.
Most recipes for stuffed cabbage have a tomatoes sauce.
I am allergic to tomatoes, but I love stuffed cabbage.

The warm cabbage, hearty filling, vibrant sauerkraut and smooth sour cream all come together for a perfectly comforting meal.
In the same large stock pot with the sauerkraut on the bottom, layer the cabbage rolls on top the sauerkraut and on top of each other.
You’ll get additional benefits because it’s made from sauerkraut and tomato sauce, and cooked tomatoes are shown to provide more lycopene than fresh.
Hungarian Stuffed Cabbage Here’s a Hungarian-style stuffed cabbage recipe that is sure to please the whole family and get them to eat their vegetables.
Hungarian Stuffed Cabbage Here’s a Hungarian-style stuffed cabbage recipe that is sure to please the whole family and get them to eat their vegetables.
You’ll get additional benefits because it’s made from sauerkraut and tomato sauce, and cooked tomatoes are shown to provide more lycopene than fresh.
We warm ourselves with with filling meals of Hungarian Stuffed Cabbage.
To celebrate our joyous reunion, we made Hungarian Stuffed Cabbage (Töltött Káposzta)–my favorite Hungarian meal.
You first boil a head of cabbage in seasoned vinegar water until the leaves are soft.
It uses an entire head of cabbage, so you know that it’s loaded with flavor as well as fiber.
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Put the cabbage head, bay leaves, spices and vinegar in a large stock pot.
The filling is what’s really going to get a lot of Paleo mouths watering, as it’s loaded up with beef, onions, and garlic.
It uses an entire head of cabbage, so you know that it’s loaded with flavor as well as fiber.

Cabbage leaves filled with ground beef and rice are simmered in tomato soup for this Polish-inspired favorite.
Cabbage leaves are stuffed with the filling which are then baked, simmered or steamed in a covered pot and generally eaten warm, often accompanied with a sauce.
A cabbage roll (also stuffed cabbage or pigs in a blanket) is a dish consisting of cooked cabbage leaves wrapped around a variety of fillings.
Popular among European Jews, and traditionally served on Simchat Torah, stuffed cabbage is described by Gil Marks to have entered Jewish cooking some 2,000 years ago.
In Lebanon it is a popular plate, where the cabbage is stuffed with rice and minced meat and only rolled to the size of cigar.
Always in Sweden and sometimes in Finland, stuffed cabbage is served with lingonberry jam, which is both sweet and tart.
In a medium mixing bowl, combine the ground beef, 1 cup cooked rice, onion, egg, salt and pepper, along with 2 tablespoons of tomato soup.

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Brown ground beef, cook wild rice, and mix both (once cooked) with heated stewed tomatoes and any seasoning of your choice.
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Cabbage leaves enclose a salty, savory filling of bacon, garlic and bread crumbs, rich with the heady aroma of rosemary in this rustic Italian dish from Chef Sarah Grueneberg.
Working in 2 batches, add the outer cabbage leaves to the boiling water and cook for 2 minutes, then transfer to the ice water until cool.

However, making stuffed cabbage rolls can be a pesky and time consuming task, but my simpler sauté version in all prepared in one pot making it an easy Weight Watchers recipe that anyone can successfully prepare.
What is the sodium content for this recipe? I’d love to try it as a simple way of doing stuffed cabbage, but I must know how much sodium.
I’m half Polish and I love stuffed cabbage! I am eager to give this recipe a try.
It’s low in fat, high in fiber and protein, and has that wonderful sweet and sour taste that I’ve always adored in stuffed cabbage rolls.
It would really help if you included stats such as: 1lb of lean ground pork, try to stay around 120 calories for 4 oz or 98% Fat Free – something else to help us find the ingredient you are mentioning, since I assume you can’t mention labels.
This deliciously healthy and low calorie Stuffed Cabbage Saute is a variation of traditional stuffed cabbage rolls, which is a popular Polish recipe.
It’s sweet and sour taste is reminiscent of traditional stuffed cabbage rolls, but this saute is a lot less work.

A traditional Sea Wolf dish consisting of pike wrapped in cabbage and steamed until soft.

Christin, you have brought back SO many memories with this recipe! I can’t remember the last time I had cabbage rolls ~ it was when I was a child ~ but it was one of my favorite comfort dishes growing up on our ranch.
Next time you need some comfort food just like Grandma’s cooking or Shapiro’s, try Stuffed Cabbage Rolls.
Cabbage leaves stuffed with ground beef and rice and cooked in the oven with a sweet and tangy tomato sauce.
I had a similar Stuffed Cabbage Rolls dish at Shapiro’s Delicatessen in Indianapolis last March.
I have never tried stuffed cabbage rolls before, these look delicious! I must try the recipe.. curious to know what they taste like.
At the point you uncover the baking dish, scoop some tomato sauce on top of the cabbage rolls with a spoon so that they do not dry out.
Stuffed Cabbage Rolls are one of my favorite comfort foods.
I found as many recipes as I could and tried to come up with something that would be similar to Shapiro’s Stuffed Cabbage Rolls.
I love stuffed cabbage rolls and so does my husband – it reminds him of his grandmother.
Stuffed cabbage rolls are a all time favorite.
Since then I’ve wanted to make Stuffed Cabbage Rolls at home.

Add the chopped cabbage, the remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt and 1/8 teaspoon pepper; cook, stirring, until the cabbage is wilted and just beginning to brown, 3 to 5 minutes.
Though traditional stuffed cabbage recipes are made with meat, here Savoy cabbage leaves are stuffed with a combination of rice, mushrooms, onions, garlic and herbs for a healthy vegetarian stuffed cabbage recipe.
Add mushrooms, onion, garlic, sage, rosemary and 1/4 teaspoon each salt and pepper; cook, stirring, until the mushrooms have released their juices and the pan is fairly dry, 8 to 10 minutes.
To prepare cabbage & filling: Combine water, rice and 1 teaspoon oil in a medium saucepan; bring to a boil.
Reduce heat to maintain the barest simmer, cover and cook until the water is absorbed and the rice is just tender, 40 to 50 minutes.

I come from the region and the recipes I’ve seen, call for a cup or so of tomato juice or tomato pulp in the sauce for the stuffed cabbage, when it is made from fresh cabbage leaves.
The winter version of the dish, made with sour cabbage (preserved cabbage) leaves is typically made without the tomato juice.
It is also very tasty, piquant and traditional in Romanian recipes to stuff sour cabbage leaves.
Stuffed cabbage is one of the "national dishes" of Serbia (where I am originally from) and for about 30 years I have been using the boiling water method, and this is sooooo much easier.
We never use any eggs in the filling for stuffed cabbage, bell peppers, grape leaves or Zucchini.

My Mother made stuffed cabbage rolls – of Hungarian descent – and every timeI used her recipe,received raves – it is easy – a bit time consuming – bu well worth it – buy a loin of pork, have the butcher cut off the fat and the chine – ground the pork – render the fat from the pork with chopped onions, salt, black pepper, pour the cooked mixture into the pork, and the white rice.
These cabbage rolls are stuffed with ground beef, onion, raisins and rice, then topped with a scrumptious tomato-based sauce.
This recipe sounds like it might have a Polish background since stuffed cabbage there generally includes ground meat, raisins and rice.

I have been promising you my mother-in-law’s recipe for stuffed cabbage or “golubtsy”, which was her mother’s recipe for stuffed cabbage, for ages but do you know what is even sadder about how long it has taken me to get to this? That if I remember correctly, I jotted this recipe down on a page from my planner (a planner! with pages in it! many moons ago, my friends.) while sitting in the back seat as we drove to check out some wedding locations.
(I like to use the large one I will cook the final dish in — a deep 12-inch saute pan — to save dishes.) Cook the onions until they are soft, add the carrot, celery and parsnip and saute them for a couple extra minutes — until they are also soft.
Pull off large leaves, cut out the large vein — if the leaf is very large, you can make two rolls from each, if it is smaller, you can cut the vein out partially and pull the sides to overlap before you roll it into one roll.
(With a side of kielbasa and pierogis, thank you.) The second is Veselka, also in the East Village — this is where I go for my winter stuffed cabbage fix.
The first is Neptune on 1st Avenue, only my favorite place to sit outside for beers in the summertime and if you think that stuffed cabbage can’t taste good after a few Polish beers on a warm night, you obviously haven’t tried it yet.
What I forgot to do — dry the cabbage leaves — led to a too watery sauce and also I under-seasoned it — I hate that.

Place the cabbage rolls on top of the chopped cabbage in the casserole dish or Dutch oven, seasoning each layer with salt and pepper.
Pork and beef mixed with rice or barley are nestled in a cabbage leaf and cooked in the oven or on the stove until tender.
Chop the remaining cabbage and place it in the bottom of a casserole dish or Dutch oven.

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