tropical fish pictures

The photo gallery area lets you upload your aquarium tropical fish photos for all to enjoy.
Please send me your photos with a brief description of the fish as well as any other information you feel is relevant.

Cichlids N.W. Cichlids Fresh Angels Barbs Bettas Bichir Cory Cats Danios/Minnows Discus Goldfish Extra Large Oddball Fish Gouramis Guppies Hatchets Killifish Larger Catfish Loaches Mollies Platy Plecos Rainbowfish Rasboras Sharks Sucker Cats Swordtails Tetras Misc.

39,047 tropical fish pictures and royalty free photography available to search from over 100 stock photo brands.
The best online search engine for stock photo images, digital illustrations and artwork, map clipart, picture clip art, and stock footage clips.

© 10/13/2014 123RF Limited 2005-2014.

3D models Adventure Canada Adze Aerial Photography AGM Alaska Alberta Analogy Angle Grinder Antelope Antiquing Antler Archaeology Archery Arctic Arctic Fox Arctic Hare Arrowheads Arrows Artifacts atlatl Aulavik Awards Badlands Baleen ballistics gel Banks Island Basement Beaches Bearded Seal Beothuk Big Rocks First Birch Bark Bird Cove Birds Bison Black Horse blogarch Blogging Blogroll bones Books Bow Drills Bows Boyd's Cove Braiding Brass British Columbia Bugs Burnside Bushcraft Butchering Caches cameras Canada Blog Friends Canadian Tire Cape Spear caribou Casts Cave Art CCNL Ceramics Chert Chimps Choris Chuckwagon Races CIDP CLEY Clovis Clyde River CMC CMH coffee Combs Conference Conservation Consignment construction Copper coyotes Craft Craft Fair Creation CRM Cuba Cultural Products Cupids Dad Danny Williams Dark Tickle Darts Deck Deer Demonstrations Devon House Digitizing Dinosaurs Dogs Dolmen Don Crabtree Dorset Drone Drum Earrings East Coast Trail Economuseum Edmonton Elfshot Elk Endblades eReaders Ermine Etsy Experimental Archaeology Experiments Facebook Family Farm Father's Day Faunal Feathers Ferryland Fibre Optic Fibre Optics Filming Fine Craft and Design Fair Fir fire Fish Fishing Flintknapping Following Food France Free Stuff Friends Funding Garmin Geese Genetics Geocentre Germaine Arnaktauyok Glass Goldstone Google Books Greenland Grise Fiord Gros Morne Groswater Ground Stone Hafting Harbour Seal Harpoon Harpoon Heads Hats Havana Hiking Historic Sites Association Holiday Home Hominids homo erectus Hooded Seal Hot Water Boiler HSA Humpback Huron Icebergs Iceland In-laws Independence I Innu Intermediate Period INTRD Inuit Inukshuk Inuvialuit Inventory Ioffe iPad Ireland Iron Ivory Ivvavik Jadeite Java Jacks Jet Jewelry John Ware Kent Kettle Lake Kindle Knapping Knives Korea L'Anse Amour L'Anse Aux Meadows Labrador Lasers Lawyer LCMA Leather Lemmings Lori Lost Stone Mapping Maritime Archaic Marketing Mary March Museum Mastercraft Warranty Meetings Memorial University of Newfoundland Metal Detector microblades Mistakes Mom Mortgage Mosaic MUNARCH Muriatic Acid Museum Music Musk Ox Neandertal needles Neoeskimo Neolithic Neolithics Nephrite New Product NLAS Norton Norton's Cove Nunavut Obsidian Office Work Open Minds Organization owls packing Palaeoeskimo Paleolithic PAO Parka Parks Canada Paypal Pendants Permafrost Pets Photography Pigment Pipes Pitch Plains Planning Plans and Profiles Polar Bears Politics Port au Choix Portfolio Pottery Pressure Flaker Pricing Prints Procrastination Provincial Archaeology Office Publications pyrite Quarries Quartz Quartzite Questions Quivers Quttinirpaaq Ramah Chert rawhide Recent Indian Recycling Red Bay Red Ochre Relative Sea Level Religion Renovations Reproductions Resolute Bay Retail Rhyolite robots Rocks Run for the Cure Running Rust Sailing Sandbox Sarlat Saskatchewan Saskatoon Scheduling Schools Science Scientific American Scotch Scotland Scrapers Sealskin SealsSom Seconds sewing Sharks Shell Shelves Shipping Shoulder shuttle Signal Hill Sinew Six String Nation Slate Snow Snow Goggles Snowshoes Soapstone Spain Spear spear thrower Spiderman Hat Spruce SPSNL St.

Fish-handler’s disease occurs when cuts or scrapes in the skin become infected with the bacteria Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae and other species.
Fish-handler’s disease is a nonspecific term that is in the medical and lay literature that describes a disease or syndrome of humans that may occur after handling fish or, in some instances, other aquatic organisms.
Handling tropical fish, coral, cleaning aquariums, swimming pools, fishing, lobster catching, and many other similar activities can introduce the bacteria into cuts and scrapes.
Fish-handler’s disease also occurs when cuts or scrapes in the skin become infected with the bacteria of the Mycobacterium, type, mainly the species marinum and fortuitum.
Handling and preparing fish and shellfish and many other similar activities can create small cuts and scrapes in the skin, where bacteria may enter.
The disease has so many names because so many different outbreaks have been associated with occupations (fishermen or lobstermen), hobbies (tropical fish tanks, pet shop workers), or water sports (boating, swimming pool use).
Developing fish-handler’s disease requires deliberate contact with fish, particularly lobster and other shellfish.

Our images can be used and modified for websites, web banners & headers, advertisements (flyers, brochures, posters), powerpoint presentations, book covers/pages, CD covers, smart phone applications, etc.
You will be granted worldwide rights for unlimited projects and up to 10,000 printed copies for free of charge content and up to 500,000 printed copies for paid content (unlimited online).

If you have any information about this artist, it would be great if you can submit it to us.
Unfortunately we don’t have any information yet about this artist.
ModeratorThis artist has no moderator.

In the wild, where the fish lives in large quantities of water, it is not often confronted with such organisms.  The fish can easily ward off an infection.  In the closed system of an aquarium, however, the disease-causing organisms multiply.  The fish is constantly picking them up, and its body, to a certain extent, is continually attempting to stop these organisms from multiplying in and on it.  The fish easily succeeds in resisting them if it is fed well and if it feels at home in its aquarium.  This involves proper water quality, aquarium maintenance, filtration, landscaping, and compatibility.
In nature a fish has huge quantities of water in which to feed and leave its droppings.  In the aquarium, however, fecal dilution is quite limited.  The more the fish swims in the aquarium, the more burdened or polluted the water becomes.  Polluted water harbors chemicals and microorganisms that are harmful to the fish.  Many of these microorganisms are parasites, bacteria and fungii that live throughout the aquarium, but they also can cause rapid depletion of the health of the fish, and disease.
You must recognize and foster this process in order to effectively care for the water in an aquarium, for, as indicated above, it has a direct relationship to the health of the fish.  There are many books on water chemistry and aquarium hygiene.  The better this process of self-cleansing is achieved–keeping the water quality high for longer periods–the rarer will be diseases in the aquarium.
Today, while it is quite possible to chemically adjust aquarium water to match the fish’s natural waters, it is hardly possible to approach their degree of cleanliness.  This is simply because of the very small volume of aquarium water.
With good hygiene, you can make it tough for the disease-causing organisms to survive.  Immediately remove any dead or sick fish.  Regularly gravel vacuum out any accumulations of debris from the bottom crevices and from the nooks and crannies of any decorative items in the landscaping.  Change the water regularly.  Adjust water parameters regularly, and properly.

All exhibited artwork, unless otherwise stated, is available for purchase through our secure online ordering system.
Prices for artwork and details for pieces can be found when you enlarge the small images.

While they are small in size, Clownfish are also popular for being one of the most accessible species of fish in the Great Barrier Reef due to their tendency to inhabit shallower waters, making them often visible by snorkelers without needing to dive down further into the reef’s depths.
Large, colourful schools of surgeonfish are a frequent sight on the reef and are the subject of many postcards and magazine photo shoots looking to promote the reef, and with good cause – a school of surgeonfish swimming in unison is the equivalent of an ocean-dwelling, moving rainbow! Triggerfish Brightly-coloured and with a distinctive, “pouty” mouth, Triggerfish are one of the most easily recognisable species of fish on the Great Barrier Reef.
Being basically a “medium-sized” reef dwelling fish and with multiple bright coloured patterns on their bodies being the norm, they are one of the most visible species in the Great Barrier Reef and help fill the waters they inhabit with a bevy of additional colour.
Wrasse The most common species of Wrasse found in the Great Barrier Reef is the Humphead or Maori Wrasse, a fish with a very distinctive feature – the large hump on their forehead from which they derive their name.
Thus, the major families of fish species that can be found in the waters of the Great Barrier Reef include: Angelfish Known for their distinctive shape and often strikingly colourful markings, Angelfish are one of the more numerous species of fish in the Great Barrier Reef, with over 80 different species in the family in total.
Surgeonfish Some of the most visually striking fish in the entire Great Barrier Reef, with vivid colours combined with patterns and stripes being the norm with the species and as a result are highly popular fish for people to keep in home aquariums.
Maori Wrasse are also one of the longest-lived fish in the entire Great Barrier Reef, with many known to live upwards of 30 years of age, but in spite of this fact are currently listed as an endangered species due to their reputation for being a delicious meal and thus previously heavily fished.
Small fish that are surprisingly territorial for their size, Damselfish are extremely diverse in terms of behaviour as well as coloration and typically stake out a designated “home” amongst the coral reef which they will then defend with their lives (often against predators much larger than themselves.) Depending on subspecies their diet consists of either plankton or algae, with the plankton eaters typically having brighter colours and the algae feeders being duller shades of orange and brown.
Groupers and Cods These large, slow, plodding reef dwellers are characterised by their stout bodies and large mouths, and are some of the largest fish that can be found in the Great Barrier Reef, with the largest members growing to a length of up to 270 centimetres and weighing in at over 400 kilograms.
Patterns which can be found on Angelfish range from thin, vivid stripes to multi-coloured speckled patterns that make no two fish of the families look exactly alike, and they form a bulk of the subjects for underwater photography for enthusiasts on the Great Barrier Reef.
Fish of the Great Barrier Reef Home to over 1500 different species of tropical fish and other variants, the Great Barrier Reef is an incredible natural location teeming with life.
Sharks While the wide range of sharks that can be found in the Great Barrier Reef – over 160 species inhabit its waters and reefs – they are sometimes unfairly labeled as dangerous predators as despite their reputation they rarely seek to attack humans.
Despite the staggering quantities of fishes that dwell within its waters, the fish of the Great Barrier Reef are divided up in to surprisingly few main families, each with significantly differing characteristics that mark the difference from one family to the next.

In comparison a large molly may be able to release up to 100 babies! I highly recommend you to purchase a "net breeder" made out of mesh rather than a plastic one as I have heard too many bad reports about them and my net breeder has worked flawlessly for me (plastic ones babies escape/get eaten or trapped!) The net breeder has a frame made of plastic and is covered in fine net to separate the fry inside the net from the larger fish swimming around in the aquarium.
Most people’s first fish to breed are livebearers simply because it’s almost impossible to not get them to breed! To get started with whatever fish you decide you’ll usualy need a pair or a trio -2males 1 female or 1 male 1 female (identification techniques later on).
1) Change 20% of the water in the aquarium each day replacing it with dechlorinated water which is as close to the temperature already in the water as possible, remembering any differences will result in stress to the fish and more chance of your livebearer aborting her pregnancy.

Animals Planent.com Copyright © 2014.

I’ve always had great results from both NLS and hikari , my only complaint about NLS is that it makes your water stink as the garlic content is so big , although this is great for the fish I couldn’t keep smelling the stench so now I feed strictly hikari and fresh frozen foods.

1869 Antique FISH lithograph, coastal tropical fish flathead mullet, Black goby a ray-finned fish, Blenny.
tropical fish pictures on Etsy, a global handmade and vintage marketplace.

GUATEMALA CITY (Reuters) – A tropical fish that lives in mangrove swamps across the Americas can survive out of water for months at a time, similar to how animals adapted to land millions of years ago, a new study shows.
Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world news, business news, technology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile, and interactive television platforms.

Occasionally, a pig Ascaris infection can be spread to humans; this occurs when infective eggs, found in the soil and manure, are ingested.
Occasionally, a pig Ascaris infection can be spread to humans; this occurs when infective eggs, found in the soil and manure, are ingested.
Infection is more likely if pig feces is used as fertilizer in the garden; crops then become contaminated with Ascaris eggs.
When ingested, the durable Ascaris eggs hatch in the small intestine releasing larva that migrate through the intestinal wall, and travel both hematogenously and lymphatically to the heart and lungs.
Infection is more likely if pig feces is used as fertilizer in the garden; crops then become contaminated with Ascaris eggs.
To find its host, an adult female screwworm seeks out exposed flesh on an animal (usually some sort of livestock, but an injured soldier or a human baby isn’t out of the question) in search of a place to lay her eggs.
Parasites are organisms that live on or within another organism, called the “host.” Most fish species are susceptible to worm infestations but a few species, particularly those in sharks and fishes in the grouper, amberjack, and drum families, appear to be more susceptible to them.
You or your children can become infected after touching your mouth with your hands that have become contaminated with eggs from soil or other contaminated surfaces or by ingesting contaminated food or water.
You or your children can become infected after touching your mouth with your hands that have become contaminated with eggs from soil or other contaminated surfaces or by ingesting contaminated food or water.
Adult female worms lay eggs that are then passed in feces; this cycle will take between 2-3 months.
Adult female worms lay eggs that are then passed in feces; this cycle will take between 2-3 months.
The life cycle of Anisakis starts when eggs produced by adult females are passed in the feces of infected marine mammals.
What is one to do, cut out those areas and continue to cook and enjoy the fish for dinner, or throw it away? Although these parasites may not look very appetizing, worms are commonly found in marine fish and are rarely passed from fish to humans.
Infection occurs when a person accidentally ingests (swallows) infectious Ascaris eggs.
Infection occurs when a person accidentally ingests (swallows) infectious Ascaris eggs.
The normal life cycle of ascaris is to migrate to the lungs for the larval stage and grow to an adult in the intestines, but sometimes the adults reside in the lungs.
Ascaris eggs are found in human feces.
If instead they are consumed by marine mammals, they will mature in the host’s intestine to shed eggs as adults.
Ascaris eggs are found in human feces.

(Yellow Albino Peacock) TFH Sep 91 Aulonocara stuartgranti (Midnight Blue Peacock) TFH Jan 90 Austrofundulus dolichopterus (Saberfin Killi) TFH May 72 Austrofundulus transilis (killifish) TFH Dec 78 Badis badis badis (Killifish) TFH Feb 91 Balantiocheilos melanopterus (Tricolor shark) TFH Apr 92 Barbodes lateristriga (T-Barb) TFH Apr 91 Barrel Skinks TFH Jan 92 Betta TFH Jul 92 Betta – Breeding TFH Feb 80 Betta imbellis TFH Nov 90 Betta picta (Javenese Fighting Fish) TFH Sep 90 Betta smaragdina TFH Dec 72 Betta spendens TFH Nov 78 Betta spendens x Macropodus cupanus TFH Feb 72 Bettas TFH Sep 92 Bettas (Wild) TFH Aug 79 Black Paradise Fish TFH Dec 72 Botia dario (Tiger Loach) TFH Jul 91 Botia morleti (Skunk loach) TFH Jun 92 Boulengerella lateristriga (Pike Characin) TFH Dec 80 Brine Shrimp Hatchery TFH Nov 90 Bunocephalichthys hypsiurus (Banjo Catfish) TFH Jan 90 Bunocephalichthys lyriformis (Banjo Catfish) TFH Jan 90 Calamoichthys calbaricus (Rope fish) TFH Sep 80 Calamoichthys calibariicus (Reed Fish) TFH Nov 78 California Kingsnake TFH Oct 91 Callichthys callichthys (Armored Catfish) TFH Mar 91 Callochromis macrops melanostigma TFH Apr 90 Callochromis pleurospilus TFH Apr 90 Canister filters TFH Dec 92 Cardiopharynx schoutedeni TFH Apr 90 Carnegiella srigata (Marble hatchetfish) TFH Jun 72 Catfish TFH Oct 80 Catfish TFH Sep 92 Catfish (Native) TFH May 91 Channa micropeltes (Red-lined Snakehead) TFH Apr 91 Chilotilapia rhoadesi TFH Jan 81 Chocolate gouramis TFH Mar 72 Cichlasoma Panamense TFH Apr 90 Cichlasoma alfari CN Jan 93 Cichlasoma atromaculatum (Three-spot Cichlid) TFH Apr 79 Cichlasoma cyanoguttatum TFH Feb 72 Cichlasoma dovii CC Jan 91 Cichlasoma dovii TFH Nov 92 Cichlasoma festae TFH Jan 81 Cichlasoma festae (Red Terror) TFH Oct 91 Cichlasoma labiatum TFH Jul 91 Cichlasoma maculicauda (Blackbelt Cichlid) TFH May 81 Cichlasoma managuense TFH Apr 90 Cichlasoma meeki (Firemouth) TFH Sep 91 Cichlasoma nicaraguense TFH Mar 80 Cichlasoma octofasciatum (Jack Dempsey) TFH Apr 90 Cichlasoma octofasciatum (Jack Dempsey) TFH Apr 92 Cichlasoma sajica (Blue-eyed Cichlid) TFH Jul 92 Cichlasoma severum (Gold Severum) TFH Apr 81 Cichlasoma sieboldi TFH Apr 90 Cichlasoma spilurum (Blue-eyed Cichlid) TFH Sep 90 Cichlasoma studies CC Jul 90 Cichlasoma trimaculatum TFH Apr 81 Cichlasoma woodringi TFH Feb 93 Cichlid (Evolution) TFH Nov 91 Cichlid Notes TFH Dec 72 Cichlid eggs TFH Sep 79 Cichlids (beginers) AD #7 Cichlids – Fostering experiments TFH Jan 92 Cichlids – peacock TFH May 92 Cichlids: Egg Spots in Lake Tanganyika Species TFH Aug 80 Cichlids: Lake Tanganyika TFH Jul 80 Cichlosoma nigrofasciatum (Pink Convict) TFH Dec 80 Ciclasoma hartwegi (Theraps) CC Jul 91 Ciclasoma severum TFH Jan 90 Ciclid pictures TFH Mar 92 Clown Plecostomus TFH Dec 92 Colisa chuna (Honey Gourami) TFH Dec 90 Colisa chuna (honey gourami) TFH Sep 78 Colisa labiosa (Thick-lipped Gourami) TFH Mar 91 Colisa lalia (Red Dwarf Gourami) TFH Jan 91 Colisa lalia (Red Lalia Dwarf Gourami) TFH Oct 80 Colisa lalia (flame gourami) TFH Nov 92 Colisa lalia (sunset gourami) TFH Jan 80 Collard lizards TFH Nov 90 Colorado River Toad TFH Jul 91 Community Cichlids TFH Aug 91 Corucia zebrata (Giant Skink) TFH Oct 90 Corydora julii (catfish) TFH Apr 79 Corydoras (catfish) TFH Oct 92 Corydoras Melanistius (Black Sail Catfish) TFH Jun 89 Corydoras aeneus (Catfish) TFH Apr 90 Corydoras axelrodi (catfish) TFH Nov 92 Corydoras eques (Golden-eared Cory) TFH Oct 90 Crenicara filamentosa (checkerboard cichlid) AD #14 Crenicara maculata (checkerboard cichlid) TFH Nov 92 Crenicara punctalata CN Jan 93 Crenicichla species TFH May 89 Cryptocoryne spiralis (Spiral Water Trumpet) TFH Apr 91 Ctenolucius hujeta (Pike Characin) TFH Jan 90 Ctenopoma acutiroste (Leopard Bush fish) AD #10 Ctenopoma acutirostre TFH Sep 80 Ctenopoma acutirostre (Leopard Bushfish) AD #11 Ctenopoma congicum TFH Jul 80 Ctenopoma kingsleyae (climbing perch) AD #11 Ctenopoma maculatus AD #10 Ctenopoma nebulosum TFH Sep 90 Ctenopoma weeksi TFH Mar 92 Cyathopharnynx furcifer CC Sep 90 Cyathopharynx furcifer TFH Jun 81 Cynolebias affinis (Pearlfish) TFH Apr 90 Cynolebias alexandri (killifish) TFH Mar 80 Cynolebias bellotti (killifish) TFH Dec 92 Cynolebias nigripinnis (Black-fin Pearl Killi) TFH Sep 91 Cynolebias whitei (Killifish) TFH Feb 91 Cyphotilapia frontosa TFH Apr 90 Cyphotilapia frontosa TFH Dec 92 Cyprichromis leptosoma TFH Apr 90 Cyprinodon macularius (Desert Pupfish) TFH Aug 78 Darters (Native) TFH Apr 91 Datniodes microlepis (Siamese tiger fish) TFH Apr 81 Diapteron georgiae (killifish) TFH Sep 92 Discus TFH Jul 91 Discus TFH Nov 92 Discus (Degen – Breeding) TFH Feb 91 Discus – Pearl Red TFH Dec 91 Diseases – Columnaris TFH Mar 92 Distichodus sexfasciatus (Six-bar Distichodus) TFH Aug 90 Dysichthys coracoideus (Banjo Catfish) TFH Jan 90 Earthworms TFH Jun 81 Echinodurus osiris (Swordplant) TFH Oct 91 Electrophorus electricus (Electric Eel) TFH Jan 91 Electrophorus electricus (Electric eel) TFH Jun 72 Electrophorus electricus (electric eel) TFH Dec 72 Elgenmannia viriscens (green knife) TFH Jun 81 Enantiopus melanogenys TFH Apr 90 Enneacanthus chaetodon (Blue-spotted sunfish) AD #10 Epiplatys annulatus (killifish) TFH Jul 80 Epiplatys chevalieri (killifish) TFH Mar 79 Epiplatys dageti monroviae (killifish) TFH Jan 79 Epiplatys duboisi (dubois’ killifish) TFH Sep 79 Epiplatys huberi (killifish) TFH Sep 92 Eretmodus cyanostictus TFH Sep 80 Erpetoichthys calabaricus (Ropefish) TFH Feb 91 Erpetoichthys calabaricus (Ropefish/Reedfish) TFH Jan 90 Farlowellas acus TFH Dec 90 Firebelly Toad TFH Aug 92 Foerschichthys flavipinnis (killifish) TFH Sep 92 Food (Brine Shrimp) TFH Apr 91 Food (Tubifex Worms) TFH Mar 91 Food – live TFH Feb 93 Foods (Grindal Worms) TFH Jan 91 Frogs – tree TFH Jul 92 Fruitflies TFH May 80 Fruitflies TFH Sep 78 Fruitflies TFH Sep 90 Fundulosoma thierryi (Ghana Killifish) TFH May 81 Fundulosoma thierryi (killifish) TFH Sep 92 Fundulus chrysotus (Golden-eared Killifish) TFH May 89 Fundulus diaphanus (killifish) TFH Aug 78 Gar TFH Dec 78 Garden Pond TFH Aug 91 Garden Pond TFH Jun 91 Garden Pond TFH Jun 92 Garden Pond – Killifish TFH Jan 92 Garden Pond – water quality TFH Apr 92 Garden Ponds TFH Jul 91 Gastropelecus sternicla (Silver Hatchetfish) TFH Apr 90 Gecko Namib Sand TFH Jan 90 Geckos TFH Apr 90 Geophagus crassilabrus TFH Apr 90 Geophagus hondae (Redhump Geophagus) TFH Mar 79 Geophagus jurupari TFH Aug 80 Geophagus steindachneri CN Jan 93 Geophagus surinamensis TFH Jul 79 Geophagus surinamensis TFH May 92 Ghost Shrimp TFH May 80 Glass Worms TFH Nov 79 Gymnarchus niloticus (aba aba) TFH Jun 81 Gymnorhamcarapo carapo (banded knife) TFH Jun 81 Gymnorhamcarapo rondoni (knife) TFH Jun 81 Haplichromis electra (Deep Water Haplochromis) TFH Apr 79 Haplochrmois polystigma TFH May 80 Haplochromis "Blue Bar" CN Jan 93 Haplochromis burtoni TFH Jun 81 Haplochromis compressiceps (Malawian Eye-Eater) TFH Aug 90 Haplochromis defrontanesi TFH Jun 81 Haplochromis electra (Deep Water Hap) TFH Aug 80 Haplochromis euchilus TFH Dec 79 Haplochromis fuscotaeniatus TFH Sep 79 Haplochromis horei (Spothead Haplochromis) TFH Nov 79 Haplochromis labrosus TFH Dec 78 Haplochromis linni TFH Dec 79 Haplochromis livinstonii TFH Sep 79 Haplochromis moorii AD #11 Haplochromis nigricans TFH Oct 90 Haplochromis polystigma TFH May 91 Haplochromis riponianus CC Sep 90 Haplochromis venustus TFH Aug 79 Haplochromis venustus TFH May 80 Hemichromis bimaculatus (Jewel Cichlid) TFH Apr 90 Hemichromis bimaculatus (jewelfish) TFH Sep 78 Hemigrammus caudovittatus (Buenos Aires Tetra) TFH Sep 79 Hemigrammus erythrozonus (Golden Glowlight) TFH Oct 80 Hemigrammus pulcher pulcher (Garnet Tetra) TFH Sep 90 Hemigrammus rhodostomus (Rummy-Nose Tetra) TFH May 89 Hemihaplochromis multicolor TFH Feb 72 Herichthys sajica TFH Jan 93 Hygophila (Plants) TFH Aug 91 Hymenochirus curtipes (African Clawed Frog) TFH Jul 91 Hymenochirus curtipes (Dwarf African frog) TFH Sep 90 Hyphessobrycon callistus (Jewel Tetra) TFH Jan 91 Hyphessobrycon flammeus (Red Tetra) TFH Oct 90 Hypospanchax modestus (killifish) TFH Sep 92 Iguanas TFH Jun 91 Inpaichthys kerri TFH Nov 79 Iriatherina werneri (Featherfin Rainbowfish) TFH Jan 92 Julidochromis marlieri TFH May 80 Julidochromis regani TFH Apr 90 Julidochromis regani kipili CN Jan 93 Julidochromis sp.

Description:Our Nature pictures collection which you see is cute animal wallpaper picture This is one of our collections that describe how beautiful our earth.
You can also find another Nature pictures like cute animal wallpaper picture .

Minimum Tank Size: The Hawaiian Fancy Bicolor Anthias does best when kept with its own species in an aquarium of at least 70 gallons, but is also a beautiful fish for the fish only, invertebrate or reef aquarium.
Food and diet: Along with algae and zooplankton growing in the tank, the diet of the Firefish Goby should consist of finely chopped small crustaceans, vitamin-enriched brine fish (live or frozen), mysid shrimp, and prepared foods.
Description:  Extremely curious goby for reef or fish tank.Very hardy, bright red head makes them easy to spot.It should be housed in a 10 gallon or larger aquarium.
Description: A popular reef aquarium fish, this species (like other members of genus Pseudocheilinus ) is not a threat to corals or ornamental invertebrates.
Feeding and diet: Along with algae and zooplankton growing in the tank, the diet of the Firefish Goby should consist of finely chopped small crustaceans, vitamin-enriched brine fish (live or frozen), mysid shrimp, and prepared foods.
Food and diet: A hardy aquarium fish, accepting a wide variety of prepared foods; live brine shrimp, plankton, mysis shrimp, green algae.
Food and diet: A hardy aquarium fish, accepting a wide variety of prepared foods; live brine shrimp, plankton, mysis shrimp, green algae.
Food and diet: A hardy aquarium fish, accepting a wide variety of prepared foods; live brine shrimp, plankton, mysis shrimp, green algae.
Food and diet: A hardy aquarium fish, accepting a wide variety of prepared foods; live brine shrimp, plankton, mysis shrimp, green algae.
Food and diet: A hardy aquarium fish, accepting a wide variety of prepared foods; live brine shrimp, plankton, mysis shrimp, green algae.
Food and diet: A hardy aquarium fish, accepting a wide variety of prepared foods; live brine shrimp, plankton, mysis shrimp, green algae.
Description: This dramatically colored wrasse is a great reef fish and is often seen cruising all over the tank looking for food.
Generally, they are not too aggressive in aquariums and can be kept with gobies, blennies and other small reef tank fish.
Reef Safe Fish are saltwater aquarium species that will not pick at nor consume corals or most invertebrates.
Description: The extremely popular Scotts Fairy Wrasse is a beautiful reef safe fairy wrasse that is a nice addition to any reef or fish only aquarium of 55 gallons or larger.
Reef Compatability: Won’t bother corals, but this fish feeds on a wide array of invertebrates, (eats great!) including snails, sand-dwelling bivalves, hermit crabs, crabs, chitons, shrimp, isopods, amphipods and sea urchins.
Reef Compatability: Won’t bother corals, but this fish feeds on a wide array of invertebrates, (eats great!) including snails, sand-dwelling bivalves, hermit crabs, crabs, chitons, shrimp, isopods, amphipods and sea urchins.
Reef Compatability: Won’t bother corals, but this fish feeds on a wide array of invertebrates, (eats great!) including snails, sand-dwelling bivalves, hermit crabs, crabs, chitons, shrimp, isopods, amphipods and sea urchins.
Reef Compatability: Won’t bother corals, but this fish feeds on a wide array of invertebrates, (eats great!) including snails, sand-dwelling bivalves, hermit crabs, crabs, chitons, shrimp, isopods, amphipods and sea urchins.
A peaceful fish, the Blue Green Reef Chromis will live many years in an aquarium with good water quality.
Level of Care: Once it is fully adjusted to the aquarium it is a hardy fish that can do great in a large tank with bold fishes such as triggers, groupers and larger wrasse.
Level of Care: Once it is fully adjusted to the aquarium it is a hardy fish that can do great in a large tank with bold fishes such as triggers, groupers and larger wrasse.
Level of Care: Once it is fully adjusted to the aquarium it is a hardy fish that can do great in a large tank with bold fishes such as triggers, groupers and larger wrasse.
Level of Care: Once it is fully adjusted to the aquarium it is a hardy fish that can do great in a large tank with bold fishes such as triggers, groupers and larger wrasse.
Food and diet:The Flame Cardinal requires a well-balanced and vitamin-enriched diet of meaty foods such as brine shrimp, frozen meaty fish foods, bloodworms, and depending on its size, live feeder fish.
Once it is fully adjusted to the aquarium it is a bold hardy fish that can do great in a large tank with moderately bold fishes such as triggers, groupers and larger wrasse.
Recommended Tank Size: The Scribbled Angelfish requires a large area to swim, so it needs a 100 gallon or larger aquarium with many hiding places and live rock for grazing.
Description:  This is a great aquarium fish, Primarily utilized to help control filamentous algae, but an all around great aquarium fish to keep in your tank.
Description: A beautiful display fish! One of the most popular and best fish for both a community or reef tank.
This is a very hardy aquarium fish, but its tankmates should be chosen carefully, as the Spotted Hawkfish can be aggressive towards other small fish, and thus should not be housed with smaller, less aggressive species such as gobies, firefishes, very small fairy wrasses, etc.
Reef Compatability: An excellent reef-dwelling fish, the Swales Swissguard Basslet will not pick on corals or invertebrates, making them an ideal fish for the reef aquarium.

Tags: , ,